“Suburban Profile: Schaumburg, Illinois” by S.M. O’Connor

      Established on Tuesday, April 2, 1850, the Township of Schaumburg is a civil township in Cook County.  Incorporated in 1956, the Village of Schaumburg was originally known as Sarah’s Grove and later as Schaumburg Center before incorporation.  Today, it spreads out from Cook County southward into DuPage County.  It is twenty-five miles northwest of Chicago’s Loop and eight miles northwest of Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport.[1]  The Township of Schaumburg and the Village of Schaumburg are named after a political entity that was created as a county in the German Realm of the Holy Roman Empire and is now a district of Lower Saxony. The Village of Schaumburg has a population of around 75,000 people and Schaumburg Township has approximately 134,000 residents.  The site that became the Village of Schaumburg, Illinois was a mix of swamp and prairie that was slow to develop.[2]  Hoffman Estates, Rolling Meadows, and Palatine are to the north.  The Forest Preserve District of Cook County’s Ned Brown Forest Preserve (Busse Woods) lies between Schaumburg to the west and Elk Grove Village to the east.  Roselle is to the south of Schaumburg.  Hanover Park is to the southwest.  Streamwood is to the west.  There are seven incorporated suburban villages in the Township of Schaumburg – Elk Grove, Hanover Park, Hoffman Estates, Rolling Meadows, Roselle, Schaumburg, and Streamwood – as well as an unincorporated area.[3] The Village of Schaumburg had a population of just 130 people when it incorporated in 1956 [4] Chinese-American model-actress Jessica Lu, who has a supporting role on Sarah Shahi’s new N.B.C. science fiction show Reverie, is a Schaumburg native.  In 2017, MONEY Magazine placed Schaumburg in ninth place on a list of the 100 best towns in which to live in the United States of America.  This year, MONEY Magazine named Schaumburg the Best Place to Live in Illinois.

Interstate 290 separates Schaumburg from Ned Brown Forest Preserve to the east.[5] Several east-west highways and arterial roads cut through Schaumburg.  Algonquin Road (Route 62) cuts through the northernmost part of town on a northwest-southeast axis.  Originally, Algonquin Road was an American Indian trail and later became the route of the stagecoach that connected Chicago to Galena.[6]  Interstate 90 (of which the Jane Addams Memorial Tollway is a part), to the south, cuts through town on a northwest-southeast axis.  Golf Road (Route 58), to the south, cuts through town on an east-west axis.  Higgins Road (Route 72), to the south, cuts through Schaumburg and Ned Brown Forest Preserve (Busse Woods) on a northwest-southeast axis.  Irving Park Road (Route 19) cuts through the southern part of town on a northwest-southeast axis.  The Elgin-O’Hare Tollway (Illinois Route 390), previously known as the Elgin-O’Hare Expressway, arcs through the southern part of town.  It opened in 1993.[7]

Schaumburg has a Metra train station on the Milwaukee District/West Line intramural commuter train line that connects the small satellite city of Elgin in the Fox River Valley to the larger city of Chicago.  Schaumburg also has a large open-air bus stop near Woodfield Mall that looks like the architect was given a mandate to design a structure that could serve the dual purpose of being a bus shelter and a science fiction movie set.  The Village of Schaumburg purchased Schaumburg Regional Airport in 1993 and expanded it in 1994.[8]

DEMOGRAPHICS – 1[9]

 

Year

Population Median Age Number of Persons Per Household Median Household Income Total Number of Housing Units

1960

986       286

1970

18,730   3.3 $12,063

5,013

1980

53,305 28.2 2.73 $26,273 21,514
1990 65,586 31.8 2.48 $47,029

29,499

2000 75,386 35.3 2.36 $60,491

33,093

2010 74,227 37.8 2.34 $67,426

33,610

 

DEMOGRAPHICS – 2[10]

Year

White Black or African-American American Indian or Eskimo Asian or Polynesian Other

1980

50,641 645 52 1,573 394

1990

62,156 1,487 38 4,414

491

2000 59,391 2,526 77 10,697

2,695

2010 52,281 3,123 162 14,754

3,907

 

The Medieval counts of Schaumburg were also counts of Holstein (in north-central Germany), and are sometimes referred to as the Counts of Schauenburg (a variant spelling) and Holstein.  During the Thirty Years’ War, the main line of the House of Schaumburg became extinct.  In 1640, the county was divided into two counties: Schaumburg, which became part of the Landgraviate of Hesse-Kassel, and Schaumburg-Lippe.  The Landgraviate of Hesse-Kassel (which sent all those Hessian troops as mercenaries to fight in the American War of Independence with which Americans are familiar) became a principality in 1803 as part of the reorganization of the Holy Roman Empire during the Napoleonic Wars.  Napoleon made Hesse-Kassel part of the Kingdom of Westphalia he gave his brother, Jérôme.  After the collapse of that client state of the (First) French Empire, the Principality of Hesse-Kassel re-emerged as a political entity and joined the German Confederation.  In 1866, the Kingdom of Prussia annexed it and it became part of the Province of Hesse-Nassau, along with the city-state of Frankfurt and the Duchy of Nassau.  Schaumburg-Lippe, meanwhile, had elevated itself to the status of principality while part of the Confederation of the Rhine Napoleon had organized as a successor state to the Holy Roman Empire.  In 1815, the Principality of Schaumburg-Lippe joined the German Confederation, and in 1871 it joined the German Empire, which was a federation of monarchies led by Prussia. In 1918, Prince Adolph II was forced to abdicate.  He and his wife later died in a plane crash in 1936.  The Federal Republic of Germany, of course, does not recognize nobility, but the current head of the noble family of Schaumburg-Lippe is Adolph II’s great-nephew, Prince Alexander.  After Adolph II’s abdication, the Principality of Schaumburg-Lippe became the Free State of Schaumburg-Lippe.  His descendants continue to live in Burg Schaumburg (Castle Schaumburg) in Lower Saxony.[11]  In the partition of Germany after the Second Great World War, the British merged the Free State of Schaumburg-Lippe with Hanover, Braunschweig, and Oldenburg to form Lower Saxony, a federal state of West Germany.  In 1977, as part of the district reform of Lower Saxony (which oddly enough is northwest of Saxony) the two Schaumburgs were re-united as Landkreis Schaumburg.  The large Schaumburg Forest is in the northern part of the district.

The first inhabitants of what is now Schaumburg, Illinois were members of the Sauk, Meskwaki (Fox), Pottawatomie, and Kickapoo tribes of the Algonquin nation of American Indians.[12]  The matter is somewhat murky, but according to legend the first Yankee settler in what is now Schaumburg was Trumbull Kent of Oswego, New York in the mid-1830s.[13]  He lived near what is now called Old Schaumburg Centre and was formerly known as Sarah’s Grove. [14]  Kent was soon joined by fellow Yankees from New England (descendants of British colonists) and also by German immigrants.[15]  Johann Sunderlage, a German immigrant, was the first recorded settler in what became Schaumburg Township. [16]    Legend has it he was one of the land surveyors who divided Cook County into civil townships and he liked the territory of what became Schaumburg Township so much he brought his family here from what would then have been the German Confederation.[17]    They settled in what would become Schaumburg Township in or around 1836 and purchased the land from the U.S. Government and obtain the deed as soon as it was lawful to do so, in 1842.[18]

Many of the German immigrants were emigrants from Schaumburg-Lippe, between the Free Imperial City of Dortmund and the city of Hanover.[19]  They settled along the route of the Chicago-Elgin Road (Illinois Route 19), which is now known as Chicago Street in Elgin and as Irving Park Road in Chicago and the suburbs and semi-rural areas between Chicago and Elgin, as well as other highways.[20]

By 1840, the German immigrant families had formed a Lutheran congregation.[21]  In that year 1840, 56% of what would become Schaumburg Township households were comprised of Yankees from New England and 28% were German immigrants.[22]    Seven years later, the German Lutheran congregation built St. Peter’s Lutheran Church.[23]  Services were held there in German until the 1970s.[24]

What became the Township of Schaumburg was known as Township 41 until 1851.[25]  Unofficially, it was known as Sarah’s Grove because three families who owned land adjacent to the grove of trees that dominated the northwestern corner of the township each had a young woman named Sarah: Sarah McChesney, Sarah Frisbe, and Sarah Smith.[26]  As David Buisseret recounted in his entry on Schaumburg in The Encyclopedia of Chicago and Chicago Neighborhoods and Suburbs, some inhabitants of the nascent village wanted to name it Lutherville, but the name they settled on was Schaumburg Center.[27]  One group of Lutherans wanted to call it “Lutherville.”[28]  Another wanted to call it “Lutherburg.”[29]  Landowner Frederick Nerge pounded his fist on the table and exclaimed, “Schaumburg it will be called!” [30]  More people in Schaumburg Township were from Hesse-Kessel and Hanover than from Schaumburg-Lippe, [31] but, as mentioned above, part of Hesse-Kessel had also been part of the original County of Schaumburg.

By the 1850s, the ethnic mixture of Schaumburg Township had changed, as 28% of residents were Yankees and 48% were German immigrants or the children of German immigrants.[32]    The Yankees moved westward to acquire land on the Great Plains and sold their land to other German immigrants as the Germans who had already settled in the area enticed relatives, mainly in Schaumburg-Lippe, to join them.[33]  A small market developed around what is now the intersection of Roselle Road and Schaumburg Road around 1858.[34]  Schaumburg Center had four cheese factories, two general stores, a cobbler, a tailor, a wagon-maker, and a blacksmith’s workshop, so it was where farmers from the surrounding region went for goods and services.[35]   Since Schaumburg was neither in the Fox River Valley and nor did it have a train stop, the farmers of Schaumburg Township had to sell their dairy goods and cattle in Chicago or Elgin.[36]

By 1860, there were 134 residents of Schaumburg Township.  The farming community of Schaumburg was ethnically all-German by 1870 as land records show all the properties in Schaumburg Township were owned by families with German surnames in that year.[37]  In effect, Schaumburg was a German colony.  Specifically, Schaumburg Township was a colony of the Principality of Schaumburg-Lippe.  The population of Schaumburg Township had risen to 863 people by 1900.[38]  The majority of Schaumburg Township landowners continued to be ethnic Germans through the 1930s.[39]    Many farmers across our federation were forced to sell their farms or lost their farms due to foreclosures during the Second Great Depression.  In the case of Schaumburg Township, some of the German farmers lost their farms due to foreclosures and the farms were acquired by non-German families and by companies.[40]    Nevertheless, German was the first language spoken in many homes until the 1950s.[41]

Although Schaumburg has a train station now, it is not an old railroad suburb (such as La Grange or Downers Grove) and development of real estate happened slowly.[42]  By 1900, Schaumburg had 1,000 residents and three cheese factories.[43]  Real estate development continued to happen slowly in the first half of the 20th Century but became a more rapid process with the North West Toll Road (now Jane Addams Memorial Tollway) in 1956.[44]  Local farmers took an active role in real estate development.[45]   When the Village of Schaumburg incorporated in 1956, it had two square miles of territory and 130 residents.[46]   In 1961, the Village Board adopted a plan that reserved large tracts of land to develop for industry, commerce, and office buildings.[47]

In 1959, Alfred Campanelli (1925-2003), began construction of ranch-style houses in Weathersfield, the first large-scale residential development in the Village of Schaumburg.[48]  Thirty years later, his company had erected approximately 4,000 homes in Schaumburg.[49]    Weathersfield now has thousands of single-family homes that Campanelli built in twenty-two stages over the course of twenty years.[50]  He built a total of 6,800 housing units in Schaumburg or 20% of the suburb’s housing stock.[51]  In 1967, International Village apartment complex opened as Schaumburg’s first multi-family housing development.[52] By the time he died at the age of seventy-eight in his winter home in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, he and his brothers had built roughly 30,000 homes in their home state of Massachusetts, as well as Illinois and Florida.[53]    In the 1960s, he donated land for Campanelli Elementary School, which was named not after him but his father.[54]    Before he had died, Alfred Campanelli had donated $3,800,000 to the Y.M.C.A. in Schaumburg to pay off a mortgage and for the construction of a field house and activity center.[55]    The Alfred Campanelli Y.M.C.A. opened in Schaumburg in 2001.[56]

Meanwhile, in 1956, the same year the Village of Schaumburg incorporated, electors at the Town Meeting of Schaumburg Township passed an ordinance that banned farm animals (specifically horses, cattle, sheep, and pigs) from running at large.[57]  That same year, Schaumburg Township had just one election precinct.[58]   Now, Schaumburg Township has ninety-four precincts.[59]   In 1977, the Township of Schaumburg moved from The Buttery on Roselle Road to the old Blackhawk School.[60]  Over the next twenty years, as the population of Schaumburg Township greatly expanded, and the staff outgrew the Town Hall, with the result that Schaumburg Township had the former school razed and constructed a facility roughly twice the size on the same site into which it moved in November of 1996.[61]

James Robert Owen (“Bob”) Atcher (1914-1993) was Village Board President of Schaumburg from 1959 to 1979.  Atcher was a recording artist with Columbia Records and Capitol Records who made country, folk, and novelty songs.  He became famous as a radio star when he joined the cast of a daily radio show broadcast by W.G.B.M. in Chicago that was picked up by the C.B.S. radio network.  His singing career was interrupted by his service overseas during the Second Great World War.  A second gig on a Chicago-based radio show came in 1948 when he joined the cast of the W.L.S. radio show National Barn Dance, which, for much of its history, was broadcast nationally.  Atcher, a native of Kentucky, parlayed the small fortune he had earned as an entertainer into a larger fortune as a capitalist.  He owned a number of businesses and was a board member of the Schaumburg State Bank.

Schaumburg was longtime home to the headquarters of Motorola, Inc. In 1968, Motorola, Inc. began to construct its headquarters in Schaumburg on Algonquin Road near Northwest Tollway (now Jane Addams Memorial Tollway).[62]  In January of 2011, Motorola, Inc. split into Schaumburg-based Motorola Solutions, Inc. and Libertyville-based Motorola Mobility Holdings, Inc. Google purchased Motorola Mobility for $12,500,000,000 in August of 2011.  The next year, Google sold Motorola Mobility’s cable modem and set-top box unit to Arris Group, a British telecommunications equipment manufacturer, for $2,350,000,000.  On Thursday, July 26, 2012, Google and Motorola Mobility announced that the headquarters of Motorola Mobility with 3,000 jobs would move to the Merchandise Mart in downtown Chicago.[63]  Motorola Mobility would be signing a fifteen-year-long lease for the top floors and roof of the Merchandise Mart for 600,000 square feet of space.  In 2014, Google announced that it would retain Advanced Technologies & Projects and most of Motorla Mobility’s patents and sell the rest of the company to the Chinese computer manufacturer Lenovo Group for $2,910,000,000.[64] In 2016, Motorola Solutions moved its headquarters with 800 workers to the Chicago Loop, specifically the office building at 500 West Monroe, where it leased 150,000 square feet of office space.[65]  Motorola Solutions also moved around a dozen software designers from New York City to Chicago.[66]   Another 300 workers in the sales unit worked at 224 South Michigan Avenue.[67]   Combined, Motorola’s two offices in downtown Chicago employ around 1,100 people, while another 1,600 remained in Schaumburg.[68]   This is part of a larger trend of big companies, including Kraft Heinz, McDonald’s, and United Airlines, moving headquarters offices from the suburbs of Chicago to the city itself.[69]   In 2015, when Motorola Solutions and the City of Chicago announced these changes, Motorola Solutions also stated it would move manufacturing and delivery options that employ about 200 workers to Elgin and sell some unused real estate at its 277-acre campus in Schaumburg.[70]

The town is best known, though, as the home of Woodfield Mall, which stands at the intersection of I-290/Illinois Route 53 and the Jane Addams Memorial Tollway (Interstate 90), formerly known as the Northwest Tollway.[71]  It was the largest indoor shopping mall in the United States of America until Mall of America opened, and remains the largest indoor mall in Chicagoland.  The name of the mall is portmanteau of two surnames, Wood and Field, as in former Sears, Roebuck & Company Chairman General Robert E. Wood (1879-1969) and Marshall Field & Company founder Marshal Field I (1834-1906).  It opened in 1971 with a ceremony attended by actor and art expert Vincent Price (1911-1993), who had a business relationship with Sears whereby the department store sold fine art he had selected.

By 1980, the Village of Schaumburg had a population of 53,305 people and encompassed 18.5 square miles of territory.[72]  During the 1980s, Schaumburg experienced a rapid increase in the construction of strip malls, office buildings, and hotels around Woodfield Mall, as well as large factories, small factories, and warehouses.[73]   By 1990, the population had reached 68,586 people.[74]

In the mid-1990s, a 500,000-square-foot addition to Woodfield with a Nordstrom’s department store as the anchor opened.[75]  Today, the anchor department stores of Woodfield Mall are Macy’s (originally a Marshall Field & Company store), J.C. Penney, Sears, Lord & Taylor, and Nordstrom.  The Lord & Taylor wing represents a 1973 addition and the Nordstrom wing represents a 1996 addition.  It is a 191-acre, two-level mall with a gross leasable space of 2,150,557 square feet.  In 2012, Simon Property Group acquired a 50% ownership stake in Woodfield Mall and the company manages the mall.  Restaurants on site include The Cheesecake Factory, Kinfork BBQ & Tap, P.F. Chang’s, Rainforest Café, Texas de Brazil, and Uncle Julio’s.  Fast food and take out eateries on site include A&W All American Food, Auntie Anne’s Pretzels, Baskin Robins®, Cold Stone Creamery, Dunkin’ Donuts, Garrett Popcorn Shops, Jimmy John’s, McDonald’s, Nestle Toll House Café, Panda Express, Red Robin Gourmet Burgers and Brews, Sbarro, Starbucks Cofee, Subway, and Wetzel’s Pretzels.  The restaurant and bar with a bowling alley and video arcade Level 257 – the name of which is a Pac-Man™ reference – now rents the third floor of Sears.  In 2018, an 820-seat Dining Pavilion opened that has additional eateries including Chipotle Mexican Grill and Blaze Pizza.  Over 250 tour groups visit Woodfield Mall per year.

Woodfield Mall has become the nucleus of a vast retail district.  Woodfield Village Green, Streets of Woodfield, and other large strip malls now surround Woodfield Mall.  One Schaumburg Place (renamed Streets of Woodfield after being redeveloped) and Woodfield Village Green were built in the early 1990s.[76]

Schaumburg is becoming a nexus of LEGO® attractions.  Woodfield Mall already had an official LEGO® Group-owned shop, The LEGO® Store at Woodfield Mall, on the top floor in the Sears wing. LEGOLAND Discovery Center Chicago is located in The Streets of Woodfield, 601 North Martingale Road, across the street (Woodfield Road) from Woodfield Mall.  It is an indoor theme park with over 3,000,000 LEGO® bricks, geared towards families with children aged 3-10.  Its range of educational and interactive attractions include hands-on play areas like LEGO® Jungle Expedition, the LEGO® 4D Cinema, the LEGO® Master Builder Academy, the Master Model Builder Workshop, two LEGO® amusement rides, LEGO® Friends Heart Lake City, LEGO® Racers Build & Test, Pirate Adventure Island, DUPLO® Village, MINILAND® — the venue’s signature re-creation of landmark locations and buildings throughout Chicago, made entirely out of over 1,000,000 LEGO® bricks, the LEGO® Star Wars™ Episode IV MINILAND Display, and Coffee Shop. Advance tickets and annual passes to LEGOLAND® Discovery Center are available online. LEGOLAND® Discovery Center Chicago, which opened in 2008, was the second LEGOLAND® Discovery Center to open in the world.

130507_0007Figure 1 Photo Credit: Sean M. O’Connor Caption: LEGOLAND® Discovery Center Chicago’s MINILAND® Chicago includes this tableau of the Chicago River, Michigan Avenue Bridge, and the Wrigley Building.

miniland_new

Figure 2 Credit: LEGOLAND® Discovery Center Chicago Caption: The Chicago O’Hare International Airport LEGO® Replica is over 3’ wide and 4’ tall with additional buildings and vehicles such as the control tower and radar tower.  It is comprised of 10,000 bricks and has three airplanes. The Soldier Field LEGO® Replica is over 7’ wide, almost 4’ tall, is comprised of 50,000 bricks, and is home to 2,000 Minifigures.

A third LEGO® store not owned by the LEGO® Group opened in Woodfield Mall on the ground floor near the mall entrance between J.C. Penney’s and Nordstrom’s.  This is Brickmania, which sells a full range of custom-made, after-market LEGO® building kits and accessories for history buffs (especially military history buffs) made by Brickmania, BrickArms®, Citizen Brick, Eclipse Graphx, Brickstuff, and other producers.  They also sell a selection of official LEGO® collectable Minifigures and LEGO® sets, as well as LEGO®-related books and magazines.  This is one of just two Brickmania stores, the other one being in Mall of America.

Blocks to Bricks™ Constructing Imagination opened in the Grand Court near McDonald’s on Friday, June 15, 2018.  This is a 12,500-square-foot art gallery dedicated to LEGO® and other building toys including Erector Sets® and Lincoln Logs® in thirteen walk-through zones that cover stone, wood, metal, and paper construction toys.    The founder is Adam Reed Tucker, one of just fourteen LEGO® Certified Professionals in the world.  He has spent around $5,000,000 on the acquisition of the artifacts in the collection in addition to the constriction costs of the art gallery.  An architect from Arlington Heights, Illinois, he founded the LEGO® Group’s Architecture theme and the temporary exhibit Brick by Brick at the Museum of Science and Industry was comprised of thirteen of his large-scale architectural models.  General admission is $15, but to get a tour of the Vault with Adam Reed tucker will cost $30.  Inspired by Mold-A-Rama machines at museums and zoos, Blocks to Bricks has a thirty-ton Toshiba Machine Co. America injection molding machine that produces two-by-four interlocking plastic bricks.  A 1,400-square-foot retail store sells on-site injection-molded bricks, brand-exclusive items, one-of-a-kind pieces, vintage sets, and limited editions.

Further, Schaumburg is home to one of the nine Medieval Times restaurants in the United States.  The address of Medieval Times Dinner & Tournament is 2001 North Roselle Road, Schaumburg, Illinois 60195.   Schaumburg is also home to one of the only two IKEA furniture stores in Illinois (the other being in Bolingbrook, Illinois).  The one in Schaumburg is the older and larger of these two IKEA stores.  It is 458,000 square feet and opened in the late 1990s.[77]  The address is 1800 East McConnor Parkway.

In 1996, the Albert A. Robin Campus of Roosevelt University moved from Public School District 214’s Forest View School, a 350,000-square foot facility in Arlington Heights that had formerly been a high school, to the old Pure Oil Company headquarters building at 1651 McConnor Parkway, a 340,000-square-foot building.[78]  Before Roosevelt University moved into the building, it underwent a $21,000,000 renovation that took a year to complete.[79]  The building is at the southwest corner of McConnor Parkway and what is now Roosevelt Boulevard. It is behind Woodfield Village Green, and across the street (McConnor Parkway) from IKEA Schaumburg Home Furnishings.  [The main campus of Roosevelt University is in the world-famous Auditorium Building, designed by Adler & Sullivan, on the east edge of the Chicago Loop.]  Roosevelt University was the first four-year, private university to have a presence in the northwest suburbs.[80]  The satellite campus in what was then North School in Arlington Heights opened in 1978.  Lewis University and National Louis University followed suit, as did Northern Illinois University (N.I.U.) and ITT Technical Institute.[81]  Lake Forest Graduate School of Management, Keller Graduate School of Management, and Lewis University Graduate School of Management opened facilities in Schaumburg, while N.I.U. and ITT Technical Institute opened satellite campuses in Palatine.[82]  Many, but not all, of the 3,000 students in Roosevelt’s fifty graduate and undergraduate programs were adult workers who took business-related classes. [83]   A lot of them had earned associate’s degrees or otherwise taken classes at junior colleges such as Harper College in Palatine and Elgin Community College in Elgin. [84]   Around 80% of Roosevelt’s students transferred from other tertiary schools, and approximately 25% transferred from Harper.[85]

Woodfield Village Green and the Hyatt Regency Schaumburg Chicago are across the street (Golf Road) from Woodfield Mall.  McConnor Parkway extends from Golf Road to the south, goes past Ram Restaurant & Brewery, behind the Hyatt Regency hotel, intersects with Roosevelt Boulevard, and connects with Meacham Road to the west.

Wildberry Pancakes & Café, one of the best breakfast places in Chicagoland, has a location at the southeast corner of Meacham Road and McConnor Parkway.  The address is 1383 North Meacham Road.  There are three other Wildberry locations: two in Chicago and one in Libertyville.  Be forewarned, they only serve breakfast and lunch, and they are especially busy on Sunday mornings.  The area with the Hyatt Regency hotel, Woodfield Village Green, Roosevelt University Robin Campus, Wildberry, and IKEA is bounded by I-90 to the north, I-290/53 to the east, Golf Road to the south, and Meacham Road to the west.

In 2000, the Village of Schaumburg purchased a forty-five-acre site on Meacham Road to develop into a convention center.[86]  Groundbreaking of the facility with 100,000 square feet of exhibit space and a 500-room hotel occurred in 2004 and it opened in 2006.[87]  Today, IKEA, Residence Inn by Marriott Chicago, Spring Hill Suites by Marriott Chicago, and Morton’s Steakhouse are north of McConnor Parkway and south of I-90, while the Schaumburg Hotel & Convention Center is north of I-90.  The sixteen-floor Schaumburg Hotel & Convention Center is at the northeast corner of Meacham Road and I-90.  The 783,000-square-foot, LEED Platinum Certified headquarters of Zurich American Insurance Company is across the street (west of Meacham Road).  [In 2016, Zurich American Insurance Company moved into this building, having moved into the Plaza Towers site at Woodfield Drive and Meacham Road in 1990 after acquiring the site and erecting a second office tower there.]  The Motorola Solutions headquarters campus is west of the Zurich American Insurance Company headquarters.  The hotel and convention center is operated by Marriot as the Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center Hotel.  The hotel has 474 rooms and 26 suits, and Sam & Harry’s Steak House, while the convention center has 148,624 square feet of meeting space.  The address is 1551 North Thoreau Drive, Schaumburg, Illinois 60173.

There are seven automobile dealerships on Golf Road west of Meacham Road and east of Roselle Road. Along this stretch of road, there is also a Portillo’s Hot Dogs on the south side of Golf Road.  The address is 611 East Golf Road, Schaumburg, Illinois 60173.  This is not the only Portillo’s location on Golf Road, because there is a smaller Portillo’s that lacks a Barnelli’s Pasta Bowl on the north side of Golf Road between Algonquin Road to the east and the Jane Addams Memorial Tollway/I-90 to the west in Rolling Meadows. The address of that location is 1900 Golf Road, Rolling Meadows, Illinois 60008.

The remnants of old downtown Schaumburg exist along the axis of Schaumburg Road, and extends for only a block or two in either direction on Roselle Road: the Old Schaumburg Centre Historic District.  The Village Board created the Olde Schaumburg Centre Overlay District in 1978 to preserve the historical character of the area around the intersection of Schaumburg Road and Roselle Road.[88]  The Olde Schaumburg Centre Commission, created in 1978, reviews restoration projects and new development within the Olde Schaumburg Centre Overlay District.[89]

The Lou Malnati’s Pizzaria location in downtown Schaumburg, at the southeast corner of Schaumburg Road and Roselle Road, is so successful it is spread out over two connected buildings.  One of these buildings is a repurposed two story residence with a wrap-around enclosed porch that houses the restaurant per se and the other is a purpose-built restaurant building that houses the kitchen, delivery service, and take-out service.  This location opened in 1985.  Lou Malnati’s has an expansive parking lot, but, on busy nights, it is difficult to find a parking space that is near the restaurant.  The address is 1 South Roselle Road, Schaumburg, Illinois 60193.

Also on the east side of Roselle Road, at the southeast corner of Roselle Road and Quindel Avenue, is Deerfields Bakery™ – Schaumburg.  In 1972, Henry Schmitt, whose family had opened their first bakery in the German city of Weisloch in 1886, acquired Deerfield Bakery in Deerfield, Illinois.  He opened a Deerfields Bakery™ in Buffalo Grove, Illinois in 1993 and the third location, in Schaumburg, in 2000.  The address is 25 South Roselle Road, Schaumburg, Illinois 60193.

In 1995, the Village of Schaumburg purchased the twenty-seven-acre Town Square shopping center (previously known as Old Town Centre) at the intersection of South Roselle Road and Schaumburg Road, and redeveloped it as Town Square of Schaumburg.[90]  It became home to a free-standing Dominick’s grocery store and pharmacy,[91] the Schaumburg Township District Library’s Central Library, the free-standing Trickster Gallery, and a number of smaller shops and restaurants in a one-story retail/restaurant building and a two-story retail/office building.  The Trickster Gallery, an American Indian fine art museum, is an operation of the American Indian Center of Chicago (also known as American Indian Center, Inc.).    In 2016, a free-standing Walker Brothers The Original Pancake House opened at the edge of the property, near the center of the side that faces Roselle.

Another branch of the Walker family already operated another pancake house on Roselle Road, Richard Walker’s Pancake House, at the southwest corner of Roselle Road and Remington Circle.  In 1948, Victor and Everett Walker opened their first snack shop.  Twelve years later, they opened the Walker Bros. Original Pancake House in Wilmette.  In 1981, Victor Walker’s sons, Way Walker and Richard Walker, Senior, opened Walker Brothers Original Pancake House in Glenview, Illinois.  In 1989, Richard Walker, Sr. opened Richard Walker’s Pancake House in Schaumburg.  He opened a second location in Crystal Lake, Illinois in 1996.  In the 21st Century, he moved to California, where he opened a third location in downtown San Diego in 2006 and in La Jolla more recently.  In 2014, Chad Walmsley acquired Richard Walker’s Pancake House in Schaumburg with plans to expand the restaurant and maintain Walker family recipes.

The Town Square shopping center is instantly recognizable because of the clock tower that stands at the center of a plaza at the southwest corner of Schaumburg Road and Roselle Road.  This plaza is Veterans Gateway Park.  At the heart of Town Square is an eight-acre feature called Town Commons, which has a pond, a fountain, a waterfall, a gazebo, and an amphitheater.  There is a free-standing Oberweis Ice Cream & Dairy Store north of Town Commons, which makes it a perfect location to take children after a stroll through Town Commons or a trip to the Central Library.

It is certainly possible to park closer to the building, in the lots behind the Central Library and on its sides, but in good weather I recommend parking at the center of the Town Square shopping center and approaching the Central Library across the Town Commons.  To truly appreciate the 165,000-square-foot Central Library, which is the second-largest public library in the state, I recommend walking westward across Town Commons, past the gazebo, the pond, the waterfall, and the amphitheater, toward the east face of the building.

1Figure 3 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: It is certainly possible to park closer to the Schaumburg Township District Library’s Central Library, but I recommend at least once parking at the center of the Town Square mall and approaching it westward across Town Commons to appreciate the size and architectural details of the building.  The journey begins with a walk through this gate.

3Figure 4 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: This is a view of the Central Library from the plaza east of the pond.

30728634_10156819105462437_2292996328239661056_nFigure 5 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: This gazebo-type pavilion structure is roughly at the center of the south end of the pond at the heart of Town Commons.

30728516_10156819106352437_3687036579584409600_nFigure 6 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: This is the Waterfall Garden at Town Commons as seen on Monday, April 16, 2018.

30727439_10156819106582437_5456549834087464960_nFigure 7 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: The checkered amphitheater plaza or performance area has what appears to be a circular landing

30726691_10156819106777437_3076672931699359744_nFigure 8 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: This is a look back at the gazebo from the amphitheater.

30708228_10156819105937437_8355236022505701376_nFigure 9 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: Normally, this bronze frog sculpture in Town Commons would be surrounded by colorful vegetation in springtime, but spring arrived late in 2018.

30725380_10156819105647437_1765740014064369664_nFigure 10 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: The commercial building south of the pond has tranquil views of the pond at the center of Town Commons.

30706683_10156819106692437_8379800770127593472_nFigure 11 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: There is a tree line behind the tiered amphitheater seating that screens one’s view of the Central Library in this corner of Town Commons.

30729930_10156818949277437_7006417855482691584_nFigure 12 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: Dedicated on Sunday, October 6, 2002, Spirit of the Prairie is a bronze sculpture of a frontier couple by David Allen Clark to the northeast of the body of water at the heart of Town Commons.  This sculpture will be on one’s left as one passes westward through Town Commons towards the Central Library.

 

 

M/I Homes recently built a new neighborhood near Town Square along Roselle Road, north of Schaumburg Road.  This is the Pleasant Square residential development, completed in 2017.  It consists of ninety-nine row houses, eight townhomes, and ten single-family houses.  The Pleasant Square neighborhood is adjacent to a strip mall on the north side of Schaumburg Road that faces Town Square.

West of this strip mall, and across the street from Larry & Dan’s Marathon, and beyond, the Central Library, as well as the neighborhood that is behind (west of) the Central Library is a large park, Olde Schaumburg Centre Park, which is a wetland with a pleasant trail.  In good weather, I also recommend taking a walk through Olde Schaumburg Centre Park before going into the Central Library.  Immediately north of Old Schaumburg Centre Park there is more green space, interrupted by a single residence, with patches of wilderness that appear to be primeval forest that were preserved to flank the entrance of Friendship Village.  The effect of this expanse of green space is to screen Friendship Village from the sights and sounds of passing motorists.

West of these green spaces, one will find on the north side of Schaumburg Road a post office.  This one is the senior of the two post offices in town, the other one being outside Woodfield Mall for the convenience of the businesses located at or around the mall and their workers.  West of this U.S. Post Office, on the north side of Schaumburg Road, at the north east corner of Schaumburg Road and Illinois Boulevard is the Schaumburg Township Hall.

Founded in 1963, Schaumburg Park District has almost sixty parks.  It also has two golf courses: Schaumburg Golf Club on Roselle Road and Walnut Greens Golf Course at the intersection of Walnut Lane and Golf Road.  There are also three outdoor pools – Bock Pool, Atcher Island, and Meineke Pool – and an indoor water park, The Water Works.  Established in 1981, the Schaumburg Park Foundation is the 501(c)3 fundraising arm of the Schaumburg Park District.

Spring Valley is a 135-acre refuge with forests, fields, wetlands, and streams.  In 1978, a $7,500,000 referendum enabled the Schaumburg Park District to build the Community Recreation Center (C.R.C.).   The address is 505 North Springinsguth Road, Schaumburg, Illinois 60194.  A grant from the State of Illinois in 1982 enabled the Schaumburg Park District to develop Spring Valley Nature Center.  In 1985, the Vera Meineke Nature Center at Nature Valley opened.  The address is 1111 East Schaumburg Road, Schaumburg, Illinois 60194.  After a traditional barn-raising in 1993, Volkening Heritage Farm opened at Spring Valley in 1997.  The address is 201 South Plum Grove Road, Schaumburg, Illinois 60194.

Professional baseball came to Schaumburg in 1999 with the construction of the 7,000-seat Alexian Field by the Village of Schaumburg and the Schaumburg Park District.[92]  Sink Combs Dethlefs Architects designed the $17,000,000 baseball stadium and Turner Construction built it with the same dimensions as Wrigley Field.  The baseball stadium was originally named in honor of Alexian Brothers Hospital in Elk Grove Village.  The Thunder Bay Whiskey Jacks moved from Thunder Bay, Ontario to become the Schaumburg Fliers.  The independent Northern League disbanded in 2010 and the Schaumburg Fliers joined the newly-formed North American League, which represented a merger of three independent leagues, was not affiliated with Major League Baseball, and folded after two years.  On Thursday, February 24, 2011, a Cook County judge ruled that unless Schaumburg Professional Baseball, L.L.C. could pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in back rent and fees to the Village of Schaumburg and the Schaumburg Park District, the team would be evicted.[93]

On Wednesday, March 9, 2011, the Schaumburg Professional Baseball, L.L.C. announced the Village of Schaumburg had blocked the sale of the Schaumburg Flyers.  The team disbanded.  That same date, the Village of Schaumburg and Schaumburg Park District awarded a lease on the stadium to Alan Oremus, former owner of concrete supply company Prairie Material and present owner of the Joliet Slammers.[94]  They did so with the understanding he would operate the stadium during concerts, community events, etc., in 2011, and found a new team to play in Alexian Field starting in 2012 that would join the American Association of Independent Baseball.[95]   Schaumburg Village Manager Ken Fritz told Daily Herald Staff Writer Eric Peterson that these events would not prevent the stadium from being paid off by the end of 2013 as planned (“Schaumburg picks new team for Alexian Field”).[96]

In 2012, the stadium became home to the Schaumburg Boomers, which belongs to the Frontier League, a professional, independent baseball league in the Midwest.  Alexian Field was renamed Schaumburg Boomers Stadium.  It can accommodate 7,365 fans with 5,665 fixed seats, sixteen luxury suites, and 200 outfield seats.  A further 900 fans can find accommodations in the lawn along the foul lines.  Located on the first base side of the suite level, the Schaumburg Club has restaurant-style seating, a full bar, and glass-enclosed viewing area of the baseball field that can be rented out for private events year-round.

The Schaumburg Boomers Stadium and Schaumburg Metra Station are clustered together in a neighborhood southwest of downtown Schaumburg, and due south of the intersection of the Illinois Route 390 Tollway and Irving Park Road.  The address of Schaumburg Boomers Stadium is 1999 South Springinsguth Road, Schaumburg, Illinois 60193.  St. John Evangelical Lutheran Church, at the intersection of Irving Park Road and Rodenburg Road, is east of Schaumburg Boomers Stadium and there is a lake between them.  Schaumburg Park District Sports Center is southeast of St. John Evangelical Lutheran Church on Irving Park Road.  Schaumburg Airport is southeast of Schaumburg Park District Sports Center on Irving Park Road.  The address is 905 West Irving Park Road.  Pilot Pete’s Restaurant is a casual, award-winning, airplane-themed restaurant at the airport.

Toasty Cheese, one of the two best sandwich places in the northwest suburbs of Chicago (the other being Rammy’s Sub Contractors, which has locations in Elk Grove Village and Wheeling) started out with a food truck, but now also has a restaurant in this part of Schaumburg, at the corner of Wise Road and Wright Boulevard.  They specialize in gourmet grilled cheese sandwiches.  The address is 951 West Wise Road, Schaumburg, Illinois 60193.

Hot Dog Express is at a new location on Roselle in Kingsport Plaza, near the intersection of Roselle Road and Wise Road.  Like Portillo’s, this may have started out as a hot dog stand, but they also make a terrific cheesy beef (Italian beef sandwich with cheese).  The address is 937 South Roselle Road, Schaumburg, Illinois 60169.

 

END NOTES

[1] David Buisseret, Schaumburg, IL” Chicago Neighborhoods and Suburbs: A Historical Guide. Ann Durkin Keating, editor. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press (2008), p. 267

[2] Buisseret, p. 267

[3] Township of Schaumburg, “History of Schaumburg Township,” (http://www.schaumburgtownship.org/about/our-history/) Accessed 06/28/18

[4] Village of Schaumburg, “Demographics” (http://www.villageofschaumburg.com/about/demographics.htm) Accessed 06/28/18

[5] Buisseret, p. 268

[6] Buisseret, p. 268

The county seat of Jo Daviess County and an old steamboat hub on the Mississippi River, Galena was named for the galena lead ore that was mined in the area successively by American Indians, French colonists, and American settlers.

[7] Village of Schaumburg, “1990” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224032027/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/Mid90s.aspx) Accessed 06/30/18

[8] Village of Schaumburg, “1990” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224032027/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/Mid90s.aspx) Accessed 06/30/18

[9] Village of Schaumburg, “Demographics” (http://www.villageofschaumburg.com/about/demographics.htm) Accessed 06/28/18

See also Buisseret, p. 268

[10] Village of Schaumburg, “Demographics” (http://www.villageofschaumburg.com/about/demographics.htm) Accessed 06/28/18

[11] There are a number of other castles and palaces named Schaumburg.  Schloß Schaumburg (Schaumburg Palace) in Rhineland-Palatinate was the home of the Princes of Waldeck and Pyrmont and is now owned by a group of Turkish investors.  Palais Schaumburg (Schaumburg Palace) in Bonn was the residence of Prince Adolph of Schaumburg-Lippe (1859-1916), who was the Regent of the Principality of Schaumburg-Lippe from 1895 to 1897 and consort of Princess Viktoria of Prussia, which made him brother-in-law of Kaiser Wilhelm II (lived 1859-1941, reigned 1888-1918).  More recently, it was the official residence of the Chancellor of the Federal Republic of German (West Germany) from 1949 to 1976 and now it serves as a secondary residence of the Federal Chancellor of Germany.  Burgruine Schaumburg (Castle Ruins of Schaumburg) in the Austrian state of Carinthia.

[12] Village of Schaumburg, “Schaumburg’s History,” (http://www.villageofschaumburg.com/about/schaumburgs_history.htm) Accessed 06/28/18

[13] Buisseret, p. 267

See also Village of Schaumburg, “Schaumburg’s History,” (http://www.villageofschaumburg.com/about/schaumburgs_history.htm) Accessed 06/28/18

[14] Village of Schaumburg, “Schaumburg’s History,” (http://www.villageofschaumburg.com/about/schaumburgs_history.htm) Accessed 06/28/18

[15] Buisseret, p. 267

[16] Village of Schaumburg, “Schaumburg’s History,” (http://www.villageofschaumburg.com/about/schaumburgs_history.htm) Accessed 06/28/18

[17] Village of Schaumburg, “Schaumburg’s History,” (http://www.villageofschaumburg.com/about/schaumburgs_history.htm) Accessed 06/28/18

[18] Village of Schaumburg, “Schaumburg’s History,” (http://www.villageofschaumburg.com/about/schaumburgs_history.htm) Accessed 06/28/18

[19] Buisseret, p. 267

Founded in 882, Dortmund was a Free Imperial City.  Free Imperial Cities enjoyed Imperial Immediacy with the Holy Roman Emperor and Imperial Diet.  Cities and aristocrats that had Imperial Immediacy did not have overlords (such as a duke) who would have been intermediaries between them and the Emperor and Imperial Diet. Dortmund was part of the international Hanseatic League.  Today, Dortmund is an independent city in North Rhine-Westphalia.  Hanover was the capital of, successively, the Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg, the Electorate of Hanover, the Kingdom of Hanover, and the Prussian Province of Hanover.  Today, Hanover is the capital of, and largest city in, Lower Saxony.

[20] Buisseret, p. 267

[21] Buisseret, p. 267

[22] Village of Schaumburg, “Schaumburg’s History,” (http://www.villageofschaumburg.com/about/schaumburgs_history.htm) Accessed 06/28/18

[23] Buisseret, p. 267

[24] Buisseret, p. 267

[25] Village of Schaumburg, “1800,” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141223224318/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/MoreontheHistoryofSchaumburg.aspx) Accessed 06/29-18

[26] Village of Schaumburg, “1800,” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141223224318/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/MoreontheHistoryofSchaumburg.aspx) Accessed 06/29-18

[27] Buisseret, pages 267 and 268

[28] Village of Schaumburg, “1800,” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141223224318/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/MoreontheHistoryofSchaumburg.aspx) Accessed 06/29-18

[29] Village of Schaumburg, “1800,” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141223224318/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/MoreontheHistoryofSchaumburg.aspx) Accessed 06/29-18

[30] Village of Schaumburg, “1800,” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141223224318/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/MoreontheHistoryofSchaumburg.aspx) Accessed 06/29-18

[31] Village of Schaumburg, “1800,” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141223224318/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/MoreontheHistoryofSchaumburg.aspx) Accessed 06/29-18

[32] Village of Schaumburg, “Schaumburg’s History,” (http://www.villageofschaumburg.com/about/schaumburgs_history.htm) Accessed 06/28/18

[33] Village of Schaumburg, “Schaumburg’s History,” (http://www.villageofschaumburg.com/about/schaumburgs_history.htm) Accessed 06/28/18

[34] Village of Schaumburg, “1800,” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141223224318/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/MoreontheHistoryofSchaumburg.aspx) Accessed 06/29-18

[35] Village of Schaumburg, “1800,” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141223224318/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/MoreontheHistoryofSchaumburg.aspx) Accessed 06/29-18

[36] Village of Schaumburg, “1800,” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141223224318/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/MoreontheHistoryofSchaumburg.aspx) Accessed 06/29-18

[37] Village of Schaumburg, “Schaumburg’s History,” (http://www.villageofschaumburg.com/about/schaumburgs_history.htm) Accessed 06/28/18

[38] Township of Schaumburg, “History of Schaumburg Township,” (http://www.schaumburgtownship.org/about/our-history/) Accessed 06/28/18

[39] Village of Schaumburg, “Schaumburg’s History,” (http://www.villageofschaumburg.com/about/schaumburgs_history.htm) Accessed 06/28/18

[40] Village of Schaumburg, “Schaumburg’s History,” (http://www.villageofschaumburg.com/about/schaumburgs_history.htm) Accessed 06/28/18

[41] Village of Schaumburg, “Schaumburg’s History,” (http://www.villageofschaumburg.com/about/schaumburgs_history.htm) Accessed 06/28/18

[42] Buisseret, p. 268

[43] Buisseret, p. 268

[44] Buisseret, p. 268

[45] Buisseret, p. 268

[46] Village of Schaumburg, “1800,” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141223224318/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/MoreontheHistoryofSchaumburg.aspx) Accessed 06/29-18

[47] Village of Schaumburg, “1900,” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224031405/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/1900s.aspx) Accessed 06/29-18

[48] Tiffany Ray, “Alfred Campanelli, 78,” Chicago Tribune, 12 April, 2003 (http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2003-04-12/news/0304120120_1_schaumburg-brothers-boy-scouts) Accessed 06/29/18

See also Village of Schaumburg, “1960-1970” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224031950/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/1960s-1970s.aspx) Accessed 06/29/18

[49] Tiffany Ray, “Alfred Campanelli, 78,” Chicago Tribune, 12 April, 2003 (http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2003-04-12/news/0304120120_1_schaumburg-brothers-boy-scouts) Accessed 06/29/18

[50] Village of Schaumburg, “1960-1970” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224031950/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/1960s-1970s.aspx) Accessed 06/29/18

[51] Village of Schaumburg, “1960-1970” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224031950/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/1960s-1970s.aspx) Accessed 06/29/18

[52] Village of Schaumburg, “1960-1970” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224031950/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/1960s-1970s.aspx) Accessed 06/29/18

[53] Tiffany Ray, “Alfred Campanelli, 78,” Chicago Tribune, 12 April, 2003 (http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2003-04-12/news/0304120120_1_schaumburg-brothers-boy-scouts) Accessed 06/29/18

[54] Tiffany Ray, “Alfred Campanelli, 78,” Chicago Tribune, 12 April, 2003 (http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2003-04-12/news/0304120120_1_schaumburg-brothers-boy-scouts) Accessed 06/29/18

[55] Tiffany Ray, “Alfred Campanelli, 78,” Chicago Tribune, 12 April, 2003 (http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2003-04-12/news/0304120120_1_schaumburg-brothers-boy-scouts) Accessed 06/29/18

[56] Tiffany Ray, “Alfred Campanelli, 78,” Chicago Tribune, 12 April, 2003 (http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2003-04-12/news/0304120120_1_schaumburg-brothers-boy-scouts) Accessed 06/29/18

[57] Township of Schaumburg, “History of Schaumburg Township,” (http://www.schaumburgtownship.org/about/our-history/) Accessed 06/28/18

[58] Township of Schaumburg, “History of Schaumburg Township,” (http://www.schaumburgtownship.org/about/our-history/) Accessed 06/28/18

[59] Township of Schaumburg, “History of Schaumburg Township,” (http://www.schaumburgtownship.org/about/our-history/) Accessed 06/28/18

[60] Township of Schaumburg, “History of Schaumburg Township,” (http://www.schaumburgtownship.org/about/our-history/) Accessed 06/28/18

The Chicago Blackhawks hockey team was named after the 86th Division (the Blackhawk Division) of the U.S. Army by team owner Frederic McLaughlin (1877-1944), who had commanded the 333rd Machine Gun Battalion of the 86th Division during the First Great World War and inherited his father’s coffee business.  The Blackhawk Division, the Chicago Blackhawks (originally called the Chicago Black Hawks), and Blackhawk School were all named after Chief Blackhawk (1767-1838) a war chief of the Sauk tribe who fought on the British side in the War of 1812 and waged the Blackhawk War in Illinois and Wisconsin in 1832.

[61] Township of Schaumburg, “History of Schaumburg Township,” (http://www.schaumburgtownship.org/about/our-history/) Accessed 06/28/18

[62] Village of Schaumburg, “1960-1970” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224031950/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/1960s-1970s.aspx) Accessed 06/29/18

[63] “Google moving 3,000 Motorola Mobility jobs, HQ to Merchandise Mart,” Crain’s Chicago Business, 26 July, 2012 (http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20120726/BLOGS02/120729809/google-moving-3-000-motorola-mobility-jobs-hq-to-merchandise-mart) Accessed 06/29/18

[64] Roger Cheng, “It’s official: Motorola Mobility now belongs to Lenovo,” c|net, 30 October, 2014 (https://www.cnet.com/news/lenovo-closes-acquisition-of-motorola-mobility-from-google/) Accessed 06/29/18

[65] John Pletz, “Motorla Solutions already finding downtown to its liking,” Crain’s Chicago Business, 15 August, 2016 (http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20160815/BLOGS11/160819920/motorola-solutions-already-finding-downtown-to-its-liking) Accessed 06/29/18

[66] John Pletz, “Motorla Solutions already finding downtown to its liking,” Crain’s Chicago Business, 15 August, 2016 (http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20160815/BLOGS11/160819920/motorola-solutions-already-finding-downtown-to-its-liking) Accessed 06/29/18

[67] John Pletz, “Motorla Solutions already finding downtown to its liking,” Crain’s Chicago Business, 15 August, 2016 (http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20160815/BLOGS11/160819920/motorola-solutions-already-finding-downtown-to-its-liking) Accessed 06/29/18

See also Greg Hinz, “Motorola Solutions moving HQ and 800 jobs downtown,” Crain’s Chicago Business, 15 September, 2015 (http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20150915/BLOGS02/150919894/motorola-solutions-moving-hq-and-800-jobs-downtown) Accessed 06/29/18

[68] John Pletz, “Motorla Solutions already finding downtown to its liking,” Crain’s Chicago Business, 15 August, 2016 (http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20160815/BLOGS11/160819920/motorola-solutions-already-finding-downtown-to-its-liking) Accessed 06/29/18

See also Greg Hinz, “Motorola Solutions moving HQ and 800 jobs downtown,” Crain’s Chicago Business, 15 September, 2015 (http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20150915/BLOGS02/150919894/motorola-solutions-moving-hq-and-800-jobs-downtown) Accessed 06/29/18

[69] John Pletz, “Motorla Solutions already finding downtown to its liking,” Crain’s Chicago Business, 15 August, 2016 (http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20160815/BLOGS11/160819920/motorola-solutions-already-finding-downtown-to-its-liking) Accessed 06/29/18

[70] Greg Hinz, “Motorola Solutions moving HQ and 800 jobs downtown,” Crain’s Chicago Business, 15 September, 2015 (http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20150915/BLOGS02/150919894/motorola-solutions-moving-hq-and-800-jobs-downtown) Accessed 06/29/18

[71] Buisseret, p. 268

[72] Village of Schaumburg, “1980-1990” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224031443/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/1980-1990.aspx) Accessed 06/30/18

[73] Village of Schaumburg, “1980-1990” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224031443/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/1980-1990.aspx) Accessed 06/30/18

[74] Village of Schaumburg, “1980-1990” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224031443/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/1980-1990.aspx) Accessed 06/30/18

[75] Village of Schaumburg, “1980-1990” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224031443/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/1980-1990.aspx) Accessed 06/30/18

[76] Village of Schaumburg, “1980-1990” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224031443/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/1980-1990.aspx) Accessed 06/30/18

[77] Village of Schaumburg, “1980-1990” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224031443/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/1980-1990.aspx) Accessed 06/30/18

[78] Tom Hernandez, “Roosevelt in class by itself,” Pioneer Press, 15 April, 1996, p. 9

In 1966, Unocal (Union Oil Company of California) acquired Pure Oil.

[79] Hernandez, p. 9

[80] Hernandez, p. 9

[81] Hernandez, p. 9

[82] Hernandez, p. 31

[83] Hernandez, p. 9

[84] Hernandez, p. 9

[85] Hernandez, p. 9

[86] Village of Schaumburg, “1990” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224032027/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/Mid90s.aspx) Accessed 06/30/18

[87] Village of Schaumburg, “1990” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224032027/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/Mid90s.aspx) Accessed 06/30/18

[88] Village of Schaumburg, “1960-1970” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224031950/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/1960s-1970s.aspx) Accessed 06/29/18

[89] Village of Schaumburg, “1960-1970” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224031950/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/1960s-1970s.aspx) Accessed 06/29/18

[90] Village of Schaumburg, “1990” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224032027/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/Mid90s.aspx) Accessed 06/30/18

[91] Unfortunately, when Safeway closed Dominick’s in December of 2013, Roundy’s Supermarkets did not purchase this location to convert into a Mariano’s, and it remains vacant.  Albertsons, the parent company of Jewel-Osco, leased the site but never opened a Jewel-Osco inside.  [Albertsons already had two Jewel-Osco stores on Roselle, one in Hoffman Estates to the west and another in Schaumburg to the east of this location.]  In 2015, Tony’s Finer Foods purchased the property with the intention of opening a Tony’s Finer Foods in the building when the Albertons lease expired but just before they closed on the purchase they learnt Albertsons had a long-term lease with options to extend it.  Albertsons extended the lease through 2021.  Through early 2016, Albertsons communicated to the Village of Schaumburg that they contemplated opening a Jewel-Osco in Town Square, but later that year they reversed course and said they wanted to work with Tony’s Finer Foods to end the lease.  Unfortunately, Tony’s Finer Foods told the Village of Schaumburg that due to those earlier delays they had made commitments to open other locations in 2016 and could not open the Town Square location in 2016.

[92] Village of Schaumburg, “1990” (https://web.archive.org/web/20141224032027/http://www.ci.schaumburg.il.us/offic/history/Pages/Mid90s.aspx) Accessed 06/30/18

[93] Eric Peterson, “Schaumburg picks new team for Alexian Field,” Daily Herald, 03/09/11

(http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20110309/news/703099984/) Accessed 07/10/11

[94] Eric Peterson, “Schaumburg picks new team for Alexian Field,” Daily Herald, 03/09/11

(http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20110309/news/703099984/) Accessed 07/10/11

[95] Eric Peterson, “Schaumburg picks new team for Alexian Field,” Daily Herald, 03/09/11

(http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20110309/news/703099984/) Accessed 07/10/11

[96] Eric Peterson, “Schaumburg picks new team for Alexian Field,” Daily Herald, 03/09/11

(http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20110309/news/703099984/) Accessed 07/10/11

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