“Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle at the Museum of Science & Industry” by S.M. O’Connor

Chicago’s three great science museums – The Field Museum of Natural History, the Adler Planetarium, and the Museum of Science and Industry – are full of artifacts, specimens, and simulations that fill visitors with a sense of awe and wonder that leave many adults and teens feeling better informed about the world, but there are two exhibits at the Museum of Science and Industry that leave adults and children alike feeling warm and fuzzy.  For generations, people from all over the world have been delighted to see Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle, one of the most elaborate dollhouses ever built, first as it toured American cities to raise money for charities during the Great Depression, and then as an exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry.  Built at a cost of $470,000 – back when that was a large fortune, not a small one – at the behest of movie star Colleen Moore, between 1928 and 1935, over 700 artists and craftsmen worked on Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle.[1]  The sum she spent is often rounded up to $500,000.  In 2013, two British newspapers, The Independent and the Daily Mail, stated the equivalent in 2013 dollars to $500,000 in 1935 dollars would be $7,000,000.[2]  “Colleen Moore” was the screen name of Kathleen Morrison (1902-1988), a silent film star who made a second fortune for herself through stock market investments.[3]  While on vacation with her parents in Hawaii in 1928, her father, Charles Morrison, suggested they build her largest dollhouse yet to contain her expansive collection of miniature furniture.[4]

This is the story of how “Colleen Moore’s Doll House” became Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle at the Museum of Science and Industry.  Given the popularity of the international tiny house movement, exemplified by television shows like Tiny Luxury, the Museum of Science and Industry now bills Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle as “The Original Tiny House.”  This was Colleen Moore’s eighth doll house.[5]  Her parents built her first doll house out of cigar boxes when she was two.[6]   The fourth one, built in her attic playroom, was too large to get out the door when the Morrison family moved. [7]   The fifth one was made out of four-ply plywood, yet it warped, so the Morrisons were very much experience dollhouse builders when they approached making this one.[8]

Colleen Moore was married four times.  Between 1923 and 1930, she was married to producer John E. McCormick (1893-1961) of First National Pictures.  Unfortunately, he had a drinking problem that grew worse over time.[9]  Her second and third husbands were both stockbrokers who taught her how to make sound investments.  From 1932 to 1934, she was married to New York City stockbroker Alfred P. Scott.  The love of her life was Chicago stockbroker Homer Pearson Hargrave, Sr. (1895-1964), to whom she was married from 1937 until his death in 1964.  He was a widower and she retired from acting in part to finish raising his children, Homer Pearson (“Buzz”) Hargrave, Jr. (1923-2011) and Judith (“Judy”) Hargrave (later Mrs. Roger Jackson Coleman), whom she considered her own.  Their mother, Homer Hargrave, Sr.’s first wife, had been Leah Loso Hargrave (1898-1933).  In Chicago, every adult in the room would know she was former movie star Colleen Moore, but as a high-society matron she would also be addressed and referred to as Mrs. Homer Hargrave.  By the late 1960s, if not earlier, she was dividing her time between Illinois and California, but considered Chicago her “home base.”[10]  Lastly, from 1983 until her death in 1988, Colleen Moore was married to builder Paul Maginot, whom she had hired to construct a residence for her in Hidden Valley, south of Paso Robles, California.

Charles Morrison was chief engineer and superintendent of the project, and was assisted by master-technician Gerald (“Jerry”) Rouleau, Senior.[11]  Mr. Morrison rented a shop in Glendale, California to be his office.[12]  Jerry Rouleau installed the electrical system and was construction foreman.[13]  Mr. Rouleau had to invent tools and equipment to accomplish this marvelous task.[14]  The actual construction of the Fairy Castle was an effort undertaken by over 100 people.[15]  Quite a few of them were workmen who made scale models for in-camera special effects.  “Many of these were miniature experts from the motion-picture studio of First National – men who produced the scaled-down scenes for the photographing of hurricanes, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, fires, or may catastrophe too costly to film in full scale,” Colleen Moore explained.[16]

Colleen Moore Fairy Castle @ the Museum of Science and Industry
Colleen Moore Fairy Castle @ the Museum of Science and Industry

Figure 1 Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: This is Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle, as seen on May 17, 2014.  The nine-square-foot castle has 1,500 miniatures.

FairyCastle_Side

Figure 2 Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: This is one view of the interior of Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle, as seen on May 18, 2014.

 

 

The Fairy Castle is nine feet long, nine feet wide, and seven feet high at the tallest tower.[17]  The nine-square-foot Fairy Castle was built on a scale of 1:12 (one inch to the foot).[18]  Designed to be taken apart, crated, and shipped, the Fairy Castle is made of 200 interlocking parts.[19]  The rooms were constructed in wood, cast in aluminum, polished by a jeweler, and then assembled according to Jackson’s plans.[20]  Although made of the light metal aluminum, the Fairy Castle weighs roughly one ton.[21]  Architect Horace Jackson (1898-1952), who was a set designer for First National Studios, drew the blueprints.[22]   [Later in his career, he worked as a screenwriter during the era of the talkies. He was nominated for an Oscar for Holiday (1930), an adaption of Philip Barry’s 1928 play of the same name.] Jackson described the style of architecture as “early fairy.”[23]  “The architecture must have no sense of reality,” he told Colleen Moore.  “We must invent a structure that is everybody’s conception of an enchanted castle.”[24]  The conceit is that the Fairy Castle is the home of a royal or princely fairy couple referred to by title as the Prince and Princess, and not by name.

 

Precedent

      Colleen Moore and her father were inspired to build a dollhouse castle they could use to raise money for children’s charities by Titania’s Palace, which they saw Major Sir Neville Wilkinson (1869-1940) and Lady Beatrix display at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles in March of 1928.[25]  Wilkinson was an English artist who had risen to the rank of major in the Cold Stream Guards. His wife, Lady Beatrix, was a mid-range aristocrat with antecedents at the very top of the aristocracy as the daughter of Sidney Herbert, 14th Earl of Pembroke, and his wife, Lady Beatrix (1859-1944).[26]  He lived in Ireland and held the office of Ulster King of Arms from 1908 until his death in 1940. Wilkinson designed Titania’s Palace and had it built by James Hicks of Dublin and a small army of Irish craftsmen over a period of fifteen years.[27]  The idea came to him one day in 1907 at his residence, Mount Merrian, which was south of Dublin, after his three-year-old daughter Guendolen told him she had seen a fairy disappear in the moss at the roots of a tree in their garden.[28]  This brought to his mind an image of fairies living underground.[29]  He resolved to build a dollhouse that would fulfill his promise to Guendolen to show her where the fairies lived and also to entice “The Fairy Queen and her Court… to transfer themselves to the visible palace, so that all the children of the world might be invited to admire them.”[30]  Titania’s Palace was built on a 1:12 scale in 100-year-old mahogany.[31]  It is named for Queen Titania, wife of King Oberon of the Fairies, in Shakespeare’s comedy A Midsummer Night’s Dream. It is dedicated to “Her Iridescence Queen Titania, her Consort Oberon, and the Royal Family of Fairyland.”[32]  The dollhouse has 3,000 artworks and furnishings.  Wilkinson wrote in the guidebook, “In these rooms will be found a collection of tiny objects of art, collected by the author during thirty-five years of travel in all parts of the world; a collection which never could be replaced.”[33] Titania’s Palace is comprised of eight component parts so it can be disassembled, travel, and be reassembled elsewhere. [34] Colonel Alexander Gillespie of Vevay made the inlaid floors.[35]  Wilkinson painted tapestries, mosaics, and frescos in the style of the Italian Renaissance.[36]  Queen Mary opened it on July 6, 1922 on her wedding anniversary, at the Woman’s Exhibition at Olympia.[37]  [Victoria Mary, Princess of Teck (1863-1953) was Queen Mary of the United Kingdom and British Dominions and Empress of India from 1910 to 1936 and thereafter Queen Dowager until her death.[38]  She was the consort of George V (1865-1936), King of the United Kingdom, Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas and Emperor of India (1910-1936).  George V and Mary were the parents of two British kings: Edward VIII (lived 1894-1972, reigned 1936) and George VI (lived 1895-1952, reigned 1936-1952).  Through George VI, and his consort, Queen Elizabeth (1900-2002), Queen Mary was the grandmother of Queen Elizabeth II.]  After a tour of 160 cities and towns in the British Isles, it toured the Americas, The Netherlands, New Zealand, and Australia. It had been seen by 1,700,000 people and had raised £80,000 “for the welfare of crippled, neglected or unhappy children.” [39]

Then it went on display in Dublin and then Ballynastragh in County Wexford.[40]  The trustees of Titania’s Palace were Guendolen and Phyllis Wilkinson, and their mother, Lady Beatrix Wilkinson (1878-1957), who married the widower Ralph Francis Forward-Howard (1877-1946), 7th Earl of Wicklow, on March 5, 1942. [41]   From that date until her death on December 3, 1957, she was known as Lady Wicklow. [42]  In 1965, Titania’s Palace lost its home and was packed up and stored at the Bank of Ireland. [43]   It was displayed at the department store Harrods in London to raise money for Irish charities. [44]   The trustees were organized under the name Tiny Crafts, Ltd. [45]   In October of 1967, it went on the auction block at Christie’s and left the control of the Wilkinson family. [46]   Mrs. Olive Hodgkinson purchased it for £31,000 and put it on display at Wookey Hole Caves in Somerset, England. [47]   While a new exhibit space was created for it at Wookey Hole, Sir Neville Wilkinson’s daughters, Guendolen and Phyllis, put it on display at a Georgian-style house designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens in Ballynastragh. [48]   When Mrs. Hodgkinson moved to the isle of Jersey in the Channel Islands, she put Titania’s Palace on display there. [49]   After her death, her trustees sold Titania’s Palace at auction for £131,000 on Tuesday, January 10, 1978. [50]   In 1980, it went on display in an exhibit hall at LEGOLAND® Billund Resort, the original LEGOLAND® theme park in Denmark. [51]   In 1987, The LEGO® Group published Titania’s Palace: The Fairy Queen’s Miniature Palace in LEGOLAND Park by Hanne Ganzhorn.  Count Michael Preben Ahlefeldt-Laurvig-Bille reached a loan agreement with LEGOLAND® and in 2007 Titania’s Palace moved from LEGOLAND to his family residence, Egeskov Castle, which has five museums on its grounds, on the island of Danish island of Funen. It remains on display on the first floor within a public area of Egeskov Castle itself.

Both in building the Fairy Castle and in using it to raise money for children’s charities, Colleen Moore was following in the footsteps of Queen Mary.  Designed by the aforementioned architect Sir Edwin Landseer Lutyens (1869-1944),[52] Queen Mary’s Doll’s House is a Palladian style town house royal palace.[53] For the façade, he referenced Inigo Jones (1573-1652) and Sir Christopher Wren (1632-1723).[54]  Queen Mary’s Doll’s House was built on a scale of 1:12 between 1921 and 1924 and is the most famous dollhouse in the world.  Gertrude Jekyll (1843-1932), designed the garden.[55]  It was the brainchild of Princess Marie-Louise (1872-1956), a cousin of George V and girlhood friend of Queen Mary.[56]  Lutyens was a friend of Princess Marie-Louise.  The whole façade of Queen Mary’s Doll’s House slides upward to display the rooms within, and, thus, the furnishings.  It has running hot and cold water and electricity.  There are cisterns in the basement and the toilets flush.  Queen Mary’s Doll’s House is electrified.  The electric lights and the elevators, which the British call lifts, work.  It was exhibited at the Empire Exhibition in London in 1924.  It was a showcase for British craftsmanship.  Many of the craftsmen who contributed miniature furniture, textiles, ceramics, silver, and soap were holders of royal warrants.  Princess Marie Louise and Lutyens solicited contributions from writers, artists, and composers, which resulted in the library being stocked with 700 miniature books.  Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) was one of the famous authors who contributed books, his being How Watson Learned the Trick.  After she formally received the doll house, Queen Mary added a miniature copper tea service she had been given by her mother and a miniature mouse made by Feberge.  Since 1925, it has been on display at Windsor Castle.  In 2016, the exhibit closed for two weeks so each room could be cleaned and each miniature object could be inventoried, cleaned, and photographed.  Each object had to be individually assessed and some of them underwent conservation by in-house conservators.

 

 

The Debut

 

Sara Ann Delano Roosevelt (1854-1941), daughter of Warren Delano II (1809-1898), widow of “Squire” James Roosevelt (1828-1900), stepmother of diplomat James Roosevelt (“Rosey”) Roosevelt, Sr. (1854-1927), and mother of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945), laid the solid gold cornerstone on April 5, 1935, at the gala opening of the Fairy Castle as an exhibit at the famous R.H. Macy & Company department store in New York City, which benefited children’s charities.[57]  In the June, 1935 issue of Picture Play, Robert Eichberg estimated that construction of the castle gave temporary employment to “seven hundred skilled workmen.”[58] Eichberg related that Colleen Moore intended on taking the Fairy Castle on a tour of American cities and possibly European cities to raise money for charity. [59]  She would make no money on the tour and might even lose money on it. [60]   “We’re going to show the house in department stores,” Eichberg quoted Colleen Moore as having said. “An admission charge will he made, but it will be so small that anybody can see the exhibit. The stores will retain a small percentage of the receipts to pay the actual expense of transporting and setting up the house. The rest of the admission fees – which we estimate from 85% to 90% —will he donated to hospitals for crippled children. Each store will choose the hospital which is to benefit from its display.”[61]  Eichberg noted, “If the fee is, say, fifteen cents as is now planned, and the estimated minimum attendance 50,000 visitors a week, the receipts will be $30,000. And if 90% is given to charity, it means that the cripples will benefit to the extent of $27,000 from this one exhibition alone.” [62]

In 1935, Garden City Publishing Company, Inc. published two books relating to the dollhouse-castle.  One was Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Most Exquisite Toy in the World.  This is a straight-forward guidebook that seems to have been written by M. Josephine Fallon, about whom I have found no information.  This booklet is in magazine format and had a list piece of twenty-five cents.  The other was a guidebook to the Fairy Castle in the form of a sixty-three-page-long children’s story-book set in the castle written by Colleen Moore herself, The Enchanted Castle. The latter had charming illustrations by Marie A. Lawson (1894-1956).    In The Enchanted Castle, sisters Bebe, an eight-year-old brunette, and Jean, a seven-year-old blonde, who believe in fairies, fall into a fairy circle on their lawn, shrink down to four inches tall, and receive an invitation from Mr. Rudytoot, the King’s Bugler, to Fairyland, where they explore the Fairy Castle.  In the end, they meet Princess Alanna, who explains her father, the King of Fairyland, built the castle for her as a wedding gift after she fell in love with a Russian prince, Tsar Saltar.  Princess Alanna explains that while she stood alone in the chapel, one hour before the wedding was to take place, the Ice King, who wanted her to marry his son, cast a spell upon the castle and all who occupied it.  She was spared only because she had been in the chapel.  Rudytoot, who was outside the castle gates because he was running late to the wedding, called out to Princess Alanna that he could not enter the castle or he would be cursed, too, but he had overheard the North Wind tell the West Wind two mortal girls who really believed in fairies could break the spell.  The book is dedicated to Bebe and Jean.

With the tour of her enchanted castle, Colleen Moore raised $650,000 for children’s charities.[63]  In one of two Forwards to Colleen Moore: A Biography of the Silent Film Star, her daughter, Judy Coleman wrote, “She went on tour with the Castle all over America, once again touching the lives of so many, but in a different way.  She touched their lives by giving them, for a brief time, a glimpse of a make-believe world, untouched by a troubled country dealing with the Great Depression.  An imaginary world of fairy tales, princesses, floating stairways, with Christmas every day.”[64]

26991677_10156458767067437_2883405146985297329_nFigure 3 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: These are the two books about the Fairy Castle that Garden City Publishing Company, Inc. published in 1935, The Enchanted Castle and Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World (propped up against one of my niece’s doll houses).

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Figure 4 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: One of two books Garden City Publishing Company, Inc. published about the dollhouse-castle in 1935 was The Enchanted Castle written by Colleen Moore (1900-1988) and illustrated by Marie A. Lawson (1894-1956).

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Figure 5 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: This is a drawing of Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle, as it is now called, by Marie A. Lawson inside Colleen Moore’s book The Enchanted Castle.

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Figure 6 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: This is the copyright page of The Enchanted Castle, featuring Marie A. Lawson’s drawing of Rudytoot.

25659294_10156347962752437_5973114925793325781_nFigure 7 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: This is Marie A. Lawson’s drawing of a knight on the Illustrations table on contents page in The Enchanted Castle.

26001187_10156347962932437_3240073343585301379_nFigure 8 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: In 1935, Garden City Publishing Company, Inc. published The Enchanted Castle, written by Colleen Moore (1900-1988) and illustrated by Marie A. Lawson (1894-1956).  One significant thing about The Enchanted Castle is that in it, and in it alone, Colleen Moore ascribed names to the Prince and Princess who rule the Fairy Castle.

How the Fairy Castle Became an Exhibit at the Museum of Science & Industry

      Major Lenox Lohr (1891-1968) President of the Museum of Science and Industry (M.S.I.) and also of the Chicago Railroad Fair, Inc., had a private train car as an office on the fairgrounds in which he would sometimes entertain people doing business with the Chicago Railroad Fair (1948-49), M.S.I., or the Citizens Committee of the University of Illinois in Chicago.[65]  As recounted by Herman Kogan in A Continuing Marvel: The Story of the Museum of Science & Industry, at a dinner reception for the Chicago Railroad Fair in its second year, 1949, Maj. Lohr was seated next to the wealthy Chicago stockbroker Homer Hargrave, one of the founders of Merrill Lynch, and his movie star wife, Colleen Moore.  In the second book on the history of the M.S.I., Inventive Genius: The History of the Museum of Science and Industry, Jay Pridmore relayed that Maj. Lohr was a movie buff.[66]  Whenever he had guests over to his home in north suburban Evanston, he invariably showed them old movies in the home cinema in his basement, and silent films were his favorites.[67] He enjoyed being able to entertain stars of stage and screen at the Chicago Railroad Fair.[68]  Thus, he was in a good condition to discuss Colleen Moore’s films Flaming Youth and Lilac Time with her.[69]  Seizing upon the opportunity, Maj. Lohr broached the subject of her placing her famous castle dollhouse on display at M.S.I.[70]  Mrs. Hargrave was originally dubious about the prospect of placing her dollhouse, which had toured the country on a fundraising campaign to care for crippled children, raising $650,000, at a science museum, but Maj. Lohr assured her it was appropriate as a diversion for people uninterested in science. [71]   Then, as he explained to the M.S.I.’s Board of Trustees, he deliberately placed it in a corner of M.S.I.’s Central Pavilion near fire-fighting equipment so people drawn to the allure of Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle would have to walk through scientific exhibits on energy to get there, in the hopes that something educational would catch their eyes along the way.[72]   Back then, the Museum of Science and Industry had no admission charge, and, according to Jay Pridmore, one of the selling points Maj. Lohr had for Mrs. Hardgrave was that at the M.S.I. children would be able to see her famous dollhouse for free.[73]  [The M.S.I. did not charge an admission fee until 1991, when it became necessary to pay off $15,000,000 in bonds issued through the Illinois Educational Facilities Authority to pay for repairs to the M.S.I.’s home, the Palace of Fine Arts.[74]]  On Saturday, October 29, 1949, Colleen Moore and Major Lohr held a private teatime preview of her dollhouse Fairy Castle.  On Monday, October 31, 1949, Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle went on public display.

In 1949, the Museum of Science and Industry published a thirty-two page booklet, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle, also known as Colleen Moore’s Doll House.  Donald Stebbing produced the picture of the Fairy Castle for the cover.  The artist and illustrator James Montgomery Flagg (1877-1960) made the drawing of Colleen Moore. In it, Major Lohr wrote, “The world of fiction has ever preceded the realm of fact; before men have achieved they have dreamed, and the stimulus of fantasy has been the touchstone of accomplishment.”

It is with great enthusiasm therefore, that the Museum of Science and Industry brings to you this story of the Doll House of Colleen Moore, for here is the timeless magic if illusion, the realities of make-believe, and perhaps … a stimulus for other ‘castle-builders’.

24129499_10156207268332437_8293819099631131298_nFigure 9 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: In 1949, the Museum of Science and Industry published The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. This booklet is also known as Colleen Moore’s Doll House, which is the title on the cover.

 

The 1949 book ends with the answer to the frequently-asked question, “Where are the fairies – Where are the Prince and Princess who live here?”[75]

Those who are lucky enough have seen them.  Perhaps it has only been a glimpse of a beautiful gown as the Princess swished out of sight on her way to the ball ; perhaps it has been only a whisper of silks and satins as the nobility of Fairyland gathered in the Great Hall.  But those who have seen them can tell you exactly what they looked like ; how they are dressed ; and because it was such an enchanting sight – each story will be different.  For such is the magic of Fairyland, for all those who still believe…[76]

The M.S.I. announced in a press release on August 9, 1958 that ten-year-old Paula Watson, of Savannah, Georgia offered to buy the Fairy Castle.  She had wanted to own it since she was age five, and wanted to know how many years it would take her to pay it off with her 50¢-a-week allowance.[77]  Considering that the dollhouse was valued at $500,000 at the time, it would have taken her a million weeks, but the unnamed Museum official she spoke to did not have the heart to tell her that, so he replied, “A great many people share your love for the Colleen Moore doll house.  Since this is the situation we think you will agree that it would be better to leave it in the Museum so that all the little girls can enjoy it rather than for you to buy it from us…Rather, we suggest you start building a doll house of your own.  Colleen Moore did this when she was a little girl and as she got older built others.  The one in the Museum is the last and best of them all.”  The press release went on to state “there were seven castles between the first doll house and the present one, which was nine years in the making.”[78]

Over 700 artists and craftsmen contributed to their talents to the castle which now houses more than a thousand separate items ranging from diamond and emerald chairs made especially for its Fairy Princess Mistress to some of the finest of miniatures carved from ivory or fashioned of gold and silver.[79]

This is why the “Lilliptian palace” was worth around half a million dollars.

On Tuesday, October 4, 1960, His Imperial Highness Crown Prince Akihito & Her Imperial Highness Crown Princess Michiko – later Tenno (“heavenly sovereign”) & Empress of Japan – visited the Museum of Science and Industry, and according to Chicago Sun-Times reporter William Braden, Mrs. Lohr personally became involved in the tour of M.S.I. when she mentioned Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle.  Princess Michiko asked to leave the planned itinerary so she could see the dollhouse. [80]

In 1971, Doubleday & Company, Inc. published Colleen Moore’s Doll House.  Doubleday & Company had previously published her autobiography Silent Star Colleen Moore Talks About Her Hollywood in 1968.  [In the 1970s, Doubleday also had a relationship with the Museum of Science and Industry as a result of which Doubleday published educational books under the imprimatur of M.S.I. These included Supercars: A Chicago Museum of Science & Industry Book by John Gabriel Navarra, published in 1975; Supertrains by John Gabriel Navarra, published in 1976; Where Are You Going with that Oil? by Roy Doty, published in 1976; Superboats by John Gabriel Navarra, published in 1977; Where Are You Going with that Energy? by Roy Doty and Len Maar, published in 1977; Electric Cars by E. John Waard and Aaron E. Klein, published in 1977; and Up, Down, and Around: The Force of Gravity by Millicent Ellis Selsam, published in 1977.]  Colleen Moore wrote the text herself and dedicated the book to her five grandchildren: Charles Hargrave, Billy Hargrave, Alice Hargrave, Kathleen Coleman, and William Coleman.  Alice Hargrave also appeared standing in the Enchanted Garden in a photograph on page 9 and Kathleen Coleman appeared in the Great Hall at age twelve on page 70.

The book was illustrated with photographs by photographer Will Rousseau of New York City.  The Fairy Castle exhibit had closed for a month in 1970 while he took pictures, which necessitated the temporary removal of exterior glass.[81]  “Each room has been cleaned,” Colleen Moore told the Chicago Tribune’s Sheila Wolfe.  “We’ve used boxes and boxes of Q-tips.”[82]

23843178_10156207431592437_4197813459974295901_nFigure 10 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: In 1971, Doubleday & Company published Colleen Moore’s Doll House. The silent film star wrote the text herself.  This was the second book she wrote about the Fairy Castle, the first being the storybook The Enchanted Castle, published by Garden City Publishing Company, Inc. in 1935.

 

In 1976, Colleen Moore donated her Fairy Castle to the Museum of Science and Industry.  The official ceremony occurred on Wednesday, December 29, 1976, with Colleen Moore Hargrave and M.S.I. President & Director Daniel Miller MacMaster, Sr. (1913-2005) aided in the ribbon-cutting ceremony by two wee little girls, Ashley Anderson and Fiona Hunt. [83]

On May 10, 1982, Colleen Moore visited Elain Diehl at her MinElain’s Miniatures workshop in Sedona, Arizona to see her nine-foot-tall Astolat Dollhouse Castle. [84]  Ms. Diehl later recounted, “I was so excited, I think the whole town heard me squeal.”[85]  One of the things Colleen Moore admired about Astolat Dollhouse Castle was a replica of a 17th Century spinet it contained that had been made by George Becker of Denver in 1978, and she later had Becker make a harpsichord for the Fairy Castle.[86]   Astolat Dollhouse Castle was inspired by Astolat Castle in the poem Lady of Shalott by Alfred Tennyson (1809-1892), 1st Baron Tennyson of Aldworth (1884-1892).[87]  Alfred, Lord Tennyson described his character thusly, “Elaine the fair, Elaine the loveable, Elaine, the lily maid of Astolat.”  The maiden died of heartbreak when Sir Lancelot from King Arthur’s Knights of the Round Table rejected her.  Ms. Diehl worked on Astolat Castle over a period of thirteen years.[88]  The Astolat Dollhouse Castle is nine feet tall, has seven floors, has twenty-nine rooms, and weighs about 800 pounds.[89]  In 1996, it was acquired by Dr. James Freeman, Ph.D., and his wife, Lois.[90]  Mrs. Freeman is an avid collector of dollhouses and owns eighty of them.  She acquired many objects to be displayed in the Astolat Dollhouse Castle.[91]  Today, it has approximately 30,000 miniatures, including pieces of furniture, paintings, jewels, rugs, and miniature books that are displayed in it on a rotating basis. [92] Like Queen Mary’s Doll’s House and Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle, the Astolat Dollhouse Castle has been used to raise money for charities.  It was displayed at Time-Warner Center at Mezzanine of the Shops at Columbus Circle in New York City to raise money for St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital, Autism Speaks, Orphan’s International, and other charities.[93]  Around 10,000 of the miniatures were on display with Astolat Dollhouse Castle.[94]  Between November 10th and December 8th of 2015, approximately 7,000 people saw it per day.  The New York Times, Vanity Fair, Bloomberg, and other periodicals reported in 2015 that Astolat Dollhouse Castle was worth approximately $8,500,000.  Bloomberg has the most lavishly illustrated profile of Astolat Dollhouse Castle.

In September of 1996, the Fairy Castle underwent conservation treatment.[95]   The ventilation system was improved to give the Fairy Castle a dust-free environment.  In 1997, the Museum of Science and Industry published Within the Fairy Castle: Colleen Moore’s Doll House at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago. Studio Blue, Chicago designed the book. Terry Ann R. Neff adapted the text with help from Scott Rose and Laura Graedel. Now Laura Graedel Partington, she was Archivist of the Museum of Science and Industry from 1993 to 2002. Little, Brown and Company published an edition on April 1, 1998 with the I.S.B.N. 9780821225196.  Architectural photographer Barbara Karant illustrated the book. Curator Michael Sarna wrote the Foreword.  David R. Mosena, President and C.E.O. of the Museum of Science and Industry wrote the Acknowledgements, in which he thanked “Mike Sarna and the late John Boca for their meticulous preservation of this magical work of art.”

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Figure 11 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: Terry Ann R. Neff edited Within the Fairy Castle: Colleen Moore’s Doll House at the Museum of Science & Industry, Chicago.

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Figure 12 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: The Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago published the booklet Colleen Moore’s Doll House (left) in 1949. Doubleday & Company published Colleen Moore’s Doll House (center) in 1971. The M.S.I. published Within the Fairy Castle: Colleen Moore’s Doll House at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago (right) in 1997.

The Fairy Castle exhibit has only become more popular over time as families have visited it over the course of generations like the Coal Mine and Yesterday’s Main Street.  In January of 2005, M.S.I. chose Electric Angel’s cover of “Velocity of Love” as the music for the Fairy Castle. In 2008, Gerald Rouleau, Jr. donated scrapbooks his parents had compiled while the Fairy Castle toured early in its history, along with a broken stained glass window that had been intended for the Fairy Castle’s Chapel.

 

2013-14 Conservation

Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle @ The Museum of Science and Indus
Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle @ The Museum of Science and Industry

Figure 13 Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: This is the exterior of Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle on June 10, 2009, prior to conservation.

FairyCastle_Great_Hall

Figure 14 Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption:  Great Hall, Colleen Moore’s Fairy Tale Castle, on March 11, 2009, prior to conservation.

 

More conservation work on Colleen Moore’s Fairy Tale Castle began on November 12, 2013 and continued through the early months of 2014.  It was closed from January 4, 2014 to January 14, 2014.  The Fairy Castle‘s electric and plumbing systems had to be replaced.

Guests were able to watch (now retired) M.S.I. Preparator Mike Cowan, Inez Litas and other conservators from Liparini Restoration Studio, and Bozena Pszczulna-Szymanski of Paper Conservation Studio at work. In the press release, the M.S.I. stated that fifty-eight of the Fairy Castle Library’s books also had to undergo restoration. Bozena Pszczulna-Szymanski treated fifty-eight books.  To stabilize these books, she had to vacuum each one, repair the spine, and consolidate the paper.

In addition, the more than 1,500 precious artifacts that have been collected from around the world and that fill the rooms of the Castle will be on display, providing an unprecedented up-close view of these precious objects. Artifacts include: a Syrian glass vase from 740 AD; a painting donated by Walt Disney; an authentic Roman Bronze head; tiny needlepoint tapestries created by a master needleworker in Vienna; the smallest Bible in the world; and more.

“We are so excited to be able to showcase this Museum icon in an entirely new way,” stated Kathleen McCarthy, M.S.I.’s Director of Collections (and my former boss). “This project also provides Museum guests insight into the conservation process. This type of work typically goes unseen by guests, but it’s critical work that is of the highest importance to us at MSI and at other Museums around the world. This is a great opportunity for kids and adults alike to learn more about the science and technology involved in preserving artifacts.”

In the press release, the M.S.I. stated, “The conservation work for the Castle requires extensive expertise in chemistry and material science as well as general knowledge of manufacturing and hand-crafting processes.”

While glowing lights and flowing water bring the Castle to life, the condition of the electrical and plumbing systems have damaged the Fairy Castle over many decades. The ceilings and walls of many rooms have been scorched by the lighting over time; and the floors have buckled due to water leakage from the aged plumbing system. The cloth-covered electrical wires are old and brittle, and the miniature light bulbs used throughout the Castle are no longer manufactured.

 

The lights will be refurbished using contemporary lighting technology that will preserve the historic look of the Castle without causing further damage to the artifact.  The five water features in the Castle will be restored and replaced with cast acrylic and fiber optic technology to replicate flowing water and prevent future damage from leaks. The original plumbing system will be treated for corrosion and left in place to preserve the historical integrity of the artifact.

After the public conservation concludes in February, the Castle will be reassembled and the exhibit will re-open to the public in mid-March 2014.

 

Curator Margaret Schlesinger oversaw the project.  Conservators from Liparini Restoration Studio assisted (now retired) M.S.I. Preparator Mike Cowan.

“Everything they do is reversible,” explained Curator Schlesinger.[96]  “For example, some of the paint on the castle’s exterior is flaking,” Medill News Service writer John Kuhn reported for Chicago Parent.  “To fix it, experts apply special glue underneath the flakes before pressing them back down and using another concoction to make surface adhere once again.  Finally, they’ll apply a matching acrylic paint for a seamless repair, one that can be completely undone layer-by-layer if future specialists think it’s necessary.”[97]

 

Fairy Castle Conservation @ the Museum of Science and Industry
Fairy Castle Conservation @ the Museum of Science and Industry

Figure 15 Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: While Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle underwent conservation from November of 2013 to February of 2014, museum visitors were able to see miniature pieces of furniture, furnishings, and works of art.  These tiny artifacts were on display in the Conservation Gallery.

Fairy Castle Conservation @ the Museum of Science and Industry
Fairy Castle Conservation @ the Museum of Science and Industry

Figure 16 Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: Tiny artifacts from Colleen Moore’s Fairy Tale Castle include a chess table with a full chess set.  Some of these artifacts are so small that conservators had to wear masks to avoid the risk of inhaling them.

The_Castle_is_made_up_on_200_interlockinig_piecesFigure 17 Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: Former M.S.I. Preparator Mike Cowan and Liparini Restoration Studio conservator Inez Litas work on Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle, which is a modular structure with 200 pieces, on October 29, 2013.

Fairy Castle Conservation @ the Museum of Science and Industry
Fairy Castle Conservation @ the Museum of Science and Industry

Figure 18 Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: A conservator working on Colleen Moore’s Fairy Tale Castle on November 13, 2013.  The Fairy Castle previously underwent conservation work in 1996.

 

When the conservation effort was finished, 1,500 artifacts were put back in place.  When the conservation project began, the Chicago Tribune posted a large picture gallery (http://galleries.apps.chicagotribune.com/chi-131121-msi-fairy-castle-pictures/).  Andrew A. Nelles took the photos.  The exhibit re-opened by Friday, May 23, 2014.

 

 

THE EXTERIOR

 

Technically speaking, Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle is a model of a castle keep, also known as a donjon, not a whole castle, because it lacks an enceinte, also known as a curtain wall, with one or more gatehouses.  However, it does have a kind of garden wall with a formal gate that encloses a courtyard, most of which is devoted a garden that has changed names over time.  This castle keep has three whole towers, one large turret, and at least five smaller turrets.  There is a bas-relief of Aladdin, his servant, and the Genie emerging from his magic lamp surmounting the door to the Great Hall.[98]

The Library has a triple-arched porch.  A mural about Rip Van Winkle surmounts the door.[99]  The frieze has a series of plaques that represent Aesop’s fables.[100]  “The Fox and the Grapes” was Colleen Moore’s favorite.[101]  Above, on the gable of the roof, are three bas-reliefs that represent Wind & Rain, Moon & Stars, and the Glorious Sun.[102]

 

The Magic Garden

 

The trees in the Enchanted Garden are made of glass and silver.[103]  According to the 1935 guidebook, water constantly flowed in the fountains.[104]  In 1935, one could see two ivory horses that pulled Cinderella’s silver coach pulled up at a Japanese fountain of verdigris copper.[105] By the time she wrote Colleen Moore’s Doll House, Mrs. Hargrave had replaced that coach with a replica of Emperor Napoleon I’s coach and the horses with four bronze horses modeled on a painting of the team of horses that pulled the carriage in which Queen Elizabeth II rode to her coronation.[106]  Fisher Brothers of Detroit, an automobile design firm, made the coach, which has gold button-tufted white velvet upholstery, and have it to Mrs. Hargrave.[107]  The bench is made of alabaster.[108]  The balconies overlooking the Enchanted Garden have bas-relief sculptures that allude to The Wizard of Oz, Don Quixote, and the Fables of Aesop.[109]  The Wizard of Oz bas-relief is on the Kitchen wall.[110]  Harry Jones produced the bas-relief and other sculptural work.[111]

By the time Colleen Moore’s Doll House was published, Mrs. Hargrave had changed the name of the Enchanted Garden to the Magic Garden.  Her granddaughter, Kathleen Coleman had redesigned the Magic Garden and participated in the annual cleaning of the Fairy Castle.[112]  “The most endearing thing here – to me, at least – is the cradle of Rockabye baby, which hangs in a tiny treetop and rocks back and forth all day long,” Mrs. Hargrave acknowledged.  “(We decided to reverse the legend and see to it that the bough never breaks.)  This golden cradle set with pearls was given to me by my Irish grandmother.  She had it made from a necklace, a pair of earrings, and a brooch she had inherited and worn from childhood.”[113]  Mrs. Hargrave added the Weeping Willow Tree, which is really a fountain, beside the bronze pool, which lies at the center of the Magic Garden.[114]  All of its branches are piped so the Weeping Willow Tree sends water into the pool.[115]  There is another fountain at the top of flower-banked stairway that recreates in miniature one of Mrs. Hargrave’s favorite times and places: the Spanish Steps in Rome at Eastertime.[116]  The Magic Garden measures 3’6” x 4’.[117]  Around Christmas, one can find Santa Claus in his reindeer-drawn sleigh above the Fairy Castle.

 

 

THE INTERIOR

 

The interior of Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle is more in keeping with a (small) royal palace than a castle keep.  Please note that Colleen Moore added furnishings to the Fairy Castle for decades.  I am basing this exhaustive description on various guidebooks she and the Museum of Science and Industry have published, and I have attempted to reconcile variations in descriptions that occurred because she replaced one piece of furniture with another but I cannot guarantee every piece of furniture here catalogued will be on display in the Fairy Castle on any particular visit to the Museum of Science and Industry a reader may make.  As the Fairy Castle has become more popular over time, the Collections Department has arranged to place some furnishings that are no longer in the Fairy Castle on display in a gallery beside the Fairy Castle room.

      Harold Grieve (1901-1993), who had re-designed Colleen Moore’s mansion, designed the Fairy Castle’s interiors, in particular, the Library. [118]  “The leading characters in Fairyland will live in this house,” he told Colleen Moore, “and they will naturally be interested in antiques.  They’ll want to shop all the auction galleries and antique places in Fairyland, hunting for King Arthur’s Round Table to go in the dining room, and Sleeping Beauty’s bed.  There will have to be a mixture of periods and places.  For instance, Aladdin’s Lamp will have an oriental connotation.  How will that go with pre-Tudor English?  We’ll have to come up with a new theory of interior design.”[119]  According to Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, Jerry Rouleau’s “copper and aluminum masterpieces in miniature may be found completing the perfect design in many of the rooms.”[120] 

      Henry Freulich (1906-1981), Colleen Moore’s personal cameraman, planned the lighting.[121]  Clifford Roth was responsible for the electrical system.[122]  She wrote, “Henry Freulich lighted the castle rooms with the gravity and finesse he gave to the most important film sets.”[123]  The Chicago Miniature Lamp Company, which manufactured surgical instrument light globes, made the grain-of-wheat-sized light bulbs for the Fairy Castle.[124]

“Each room is a separate unit, with lighting and plumbing that can be disconnected or reconnected in one operation,” Terry Ann R. Neff enucleated in Within the Fairy Castle.  “A waterworks concealed in one of the towers supplies running water to all the minute spigots; distilled water, used to prevent corrosion of the tiny pipes, is recirculated through the plumbing of the centrifugal pump.”[125]

Arthur William Brown also contributed to the Fairy Castle, though I have been unable to identify in what way.[126] Similarly, Hubert Julian (“Jay”) Stowitts (1892-1953) produced a painting for the Fairy Castle, but I have been unable to locate where it is in the building.[127]

 

The Great Hall

Colleen Moore Fairy Castle @ the Museum of Science and Industry
Colleen Moore Fairy Castle @ the Museum of Science and Industry

Figure 19 Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption:  This is the Great Hall, as seen on May 19, 2014.

 

The Great Hall measures 3’6” x 4’3”.[128]  Originally, the floor of the Great Hall was onyx, according to the 1935 guidebook.  Now, the floor of the Great Hall is comprised of ivory tile inlaid with gold rose vines. [129]   The Great Hall has a vaulted cathedral ceiling, painted with allusions to the fairy tales recorded by the Brothers Grimm, and a floating staircase, which is to say the staircase has no structural support, aside from a column that rises to meet the landing where it pivots to the side.[130]

In front of the column is an 18th Century French ivory sculpture of Pluto and his niece-wife Persephone.[131]  Pridmore pointed out this sculpture is a “perfect [miniature] replica of Bernini’s Pluto and Persephone.”[132]  The English name of the Baroque marble sculpture is The Rape of Proserpina, and in more recent times has been called The Abduction of Proserpina, and it was executed by Gian Lorenzo Bernini (1598-1680) between 1621 and 1622 for Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1577-1633), a prince of the church and a patron of the arts whose maternal uncle was Pope Paul V (lived 1550-1621, reigned 1605-1621).  [Proserpina is the Latin name of Persephone.]  A museum visitor will not see the sculpture in sufficient detail, but on p. 71 of Colleen Moore’s Doll House, the sculpture of Pluto and Persephone shows the statue in sufficient detail to demonstrate the sculptor who made the miniature replica (as well as Bernini) managed to capture the horror of the moment from the Greek myth when Pluto carried off Kore, daughter of his sister Demeter (Ceres to the Romans), Goddess of Agriculture, to his kingdom, the Underworld.  There, she became Persephone, Queen of the Underworld.  What the statue does not communicate is that in Greek mythology Demeter pressured Zeus to rule Persephone could return to her for part of every year, which was the origin of springtime.

The Great Hall has stanchions like a museum or one of those castles or palaces in Europe where a ruling or deposed imperial, royal, or noble family is in residence but largely remains in their private apartments while most of the building is open to the public on certain days or throughout the year.  Colleen Moore wrote, “The great hall serves as the picture gallery and museum of the castle, and it contains a variegated assortment of articles on display.  It is here that the little people could be presumed to show their tiny treasures.”[133]  For example, under a glass bell atop a rosewood table are the chairs of the Three Bears, carved from balsa wood. [134]   The largest chair weighs 150,000 of an ounce.[135]  The glass bell is there to protect the chairs lest someone sneeze.[136]

Next to the chairs one will see on display the Hans Brinker’s silver skates and Cinderella’s glass slippers.[137]  After Colleen Moore searched in vain for Cinderella’s glass slippers in Venice, Bohemia, and Scandinavia, she expressed her frustration in an interview with a journalist in Michigan, and in response a glass blower wrote her that he had what might have been the only pipe in the world capable of such work.[138]  E.H. Rohl of Jackson, Michigan, a retired exhibition glass blower who had worked for Ringling Brothers Circus, made the glass slippers of Cinderella, which are hollow, have high heels, and are a little over one-quarter of an inch long.[139]

In the Great Hall, one will find a Kohl vase from ancient Egypt that once held mascara.[140]  It is around 2,500 years old.[141]  There are two idols of the ancient Egyptian goddess Isis (whose cult spread to the Seleucid Empire, Greece, and Italy even before the Roman Empire conquered Ptolemaic Egypt) that are over 2,000 years old and less than an inch in height.[142]  The dark one is made of lapis lazuli and Mrs. Hargrave considered it to be in mint condition.[143]   Gordon Loud, an Egyptologist friend of Colleen Moore, brought it from an archeological dig in Egypt.[144]   [Gordon Loud was Director of The Oriental Institute of The University of Chicago.] The lighter one has a green glaze.[145]  The 5 ½” x 2” Greek terra cotta head was made about 2,000 years ago, and the Roman bronze head was made in the 1st Century A.D., both of which were found in Israel.[146]  The terra cotta head is an Indian Madonna (so it would have been the work of Thomist Christians) and came to Colleen Moore from New Delhi, India.[147]  A curator of the Toledo Museum of Art presented Colleen Moore with the blue Syrian vase, which was made around 740 A.D.[148]  The Museum of Art in Bangkok, Thailand, gave her the Chinese jar, which is about 1,000 years old.[149]

Willy Pogany painted Alice and her friends of Wonderland. [150]  Lisbeth Stone Barret painted Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.[151]  Actress Marguerite Clark modeled for the painting. [152]  Miniaturist painter Lisbeth Stone Barrett also painted Little Red Riding Hood on ivory.[153]  George McManus painted his comic strip character Jiggs as Old King Cole in the 4 ½” x 3 ½” framed picture.[154]  Walt Disney (or at least Walt Disney Studios) painted Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse as the King and Queen of Hearts in the 3 ⅝” x 4 ⅝” framed picture.[155]  Percy Crosby (1891-1964) painted his comic strip character Skippy.[156]  Leon Gordon painted Irene, for which Colleen Moore was the model.[157]  This was a miniature of a painting he had made of her for the film Irene (1926), which was produced by Colleen Moore’s first husband, John McCormick.[158] Alex Grigg painted Colleen Moore’s stepdaughter Judy Hargrave (Mrs. Roger Coleman) as a water sprite.[159]

A silver dueling pistol that is really capable of firing silver bullets rests on a carved ivory table.[160]  On a rack nearby rests an American musket.[161]  Colleen Moore explained that “the little tool that resembles a nutcracker” makes bullets the size of grains of rice for the pistol and musket.[162]

According to the 1949 guidebook, a table of gold and enamel supported the Goose that Lays the Golden Eggs, along with a basket of golden eggs she already laid, and according to Mrs. Hargrave it was a Battersea table.[163]  Near this is the singing harp Jack stole from the giant when he climbed the beanstalk. [164]  The Great Hall also has a Battersea loveseat and chairs.[165]

A carved ivory cabinet is home to a collection of jade snuff bottles. [166]  An ivory statuette of the Goose Boy of Sparta is inside another cabinet. [167]

According to the 1949 guidebook, the crown jewels of the Prince and Princess rested on a silver table.[168]  The gold crown of the Prince was set with rubies and sapphires. [169]  Next to it lay the scepter, which is also set with rubies and sapphires.[170]  The crown of the Princess is surmounted by a ring of pearls, and at its center is a shamrock that is made of emeralds.[171] Near it rested a fairy’s magic wand.[172]  Back when the 1935 guidebook was published, the crown of the Princess was in her bedroom.[173]  The description Colleen Moore gave of the Crown Jewels on display in the Great Hall in her book published in 1971 leads me to believe she left what had been the crown of the Princess, removed the crown of the Prince, replaced the scepter, removed the magic wand, and added an orb (even though an imperial orb would have been reserved for an emperor).

 

The Crown Jewels are also kept in the great hall.  The crown, trimmed with oriental pearls, a platinum star in which a diamond is imbedded, and an emerald chiseled into the shape of a shamrock beneath, resides in a gold box, engraved in Gaelic with the inscription: ‘Love Never Dies.’  The scepter has a diamond-studded star at its tip, and a gold orb completes the panoply.  These exquisite jewels were commissioned by an impassioned friend of my youth and produced by Brock and Company, Los Angeles jewelers.[174]

 

On the other hand, the crown she described may have been similar to the one that had previously been identified as the crown of the princess because the descriptions of that crown in the 1935 and 1949 guidebooks did not include a platinum star.  The new crown is a closed imperial crown rather than an open royal crown.

A bank of modern, floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking the Magic Garden are etched with allusions to Jack and the Beanstalk, Prince Charming, and the Princess and the Seven Swans. [175]  Two pillars support a frieze above the doorway that leads into the Magic Garden that depicts the Pied Piper of Hamelin and the children he enthralled. [176] Two suits of armor that belonged to the silent film heartthrob Rudolph Valentino (1895-1926) flank this doorway.[177]

Alternatively, the fairy residents (or guests) could turn left and take a short flight of stairs and walk into the Chapel. [178] Above the doorway to the Chapel is an ivory icon of Saint Barnabus. [179]

 

The Fairy Castle’s Christmas Tree

During Christmastime, the Christmas tree gets installed in the Great Hall.[180]  Mrs. Hargrave wrote, “The Christmas tree in the castle, ten inches tall, is like Christmas trees everywhere, trimmed with tinsel and love, baubles and hope, trivialities and faith.  It embodies loving kindness and a yearning for the splendors of heaven, the instinct for sharing and the symbolism of peace and good will.”[181]

 

The Library

The Library measures 2’3” x 3’3”.[182]  Harold Grieve chose a combination of aquatic and astrological themes for the Library.  The inlaid walnut Library floor has astrological signs of the Zodiac inset in gold that is supposed to represent “an ancient magic design once known only in the temples of Atlantis.”[183]  Above this circle is the Library Dome, which is adorned by a star map that depicts every major constellation that can be seen in the Northern Hemisphere.[184]  There are two arched doorways that lead into the Magic Garden. [185]  One is surmounted by a relief of Gulliver leading a fleet of Lilliputian ships and the other is surmounted by a relief of Robinson Crusoe.[186]

The fireplace stands between the two doorways.  High above the fireplace is a depiction of Captain Kidd. [187]  The fireplace andirons are formed of an anchor and ship capstans,[188] a capstan being a rotating machine with a vertical axel on the deck of a sailing ship that seamen use to multiply their pulling force as they haul ropes, cables, and hawsers.  Images of mermaids are enmeshed in the golden net that drapes over this fireplace.[189]  Neptune, the Roman counterpart to the Greek sea god Poseidon, can be seen smiling down on the action, surmounting the fireplace.[190] [The 1949 publication refers to the Roman sea god as “Old King Neptune,” but that does not convey the mythological figure’s importance.] The model for his face was Wallace Fitzgerald Beery (1885-1949),[191] an American character actor who played Long John Silver in Treasure Island (1934), Victor Fleming’s adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s famous novel of the same name, published in 1883.

A fairy would have to ascend a short flight of stairs to access the bookcases at either end of the Library.  If a fairy is standing in the center of the Library, facing the fireplace, he or she would find in the right-hand corner, the three bookcases are arranged like stairs in descending order with the tallest in the corner, the shortest at the far end, and one of medium height in between the two.  This section of the Library is devoted to Geography, hence the globe spinning on the nose of a seal in front of the tallest bookcase, which measures 4 ½” x 2 ¼” x 2 ¼”.[192]  Books by Dutch-American journalist, historian, and children’s book author Hendrik Willem van Loon (1882-1944) can be found in this section.[193]  The Aurora Borealis is depicted on the wall above these bookcases.[194]  Tortoise-shells lead up to the bookcases at this end of the Library.[195]  There is a tall candelabrum standing between the fireplace and the doorway to the right.[196]  The bookcases are made of verdigris copper.[197]

The way an Aurora Borealis adorns the wall on one end of the room, a rainbow with a pot of god at each end adorns the wall on the other end.[198]  Between the pots of gold, Mrs. Hargrave added a 500-year-old sandalwood sculpture of Buddha.[199]  In this section, a fairy would discover, amongst the books, two photographic albums, one devoted to European royalty, and the other devoted to movie stars.[200]

The aquatic-themed upholstered furniture includes divans supported by seashells.[201]   The divans were misidentified as settees in the 1949 publication, but the furniture was charmingly described by the unidentified writer.

Scattered in comfortable fashion around the room are easy chairs and settees of upholstered sea shells upheld by sea horses.  Book-minded leprechauns are especially fond of the library’s furnishings as these have been designed for their favorite reading positions.  There’s a ‘tummy-reading chair’ for this type or reader, as well as one for the ‘elbow muser’ and the elf who likes to read on his back with his feet in the air.[202]

Back when The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle was published, in 1949, a postage stamp-sized copy of a magazine rested on one of the Library tables, as did a minute copy of Colleen Moore’s book The Enchanted Castle.[203]

There are over eighty books in the Fairy Castle’s Library.  The first miniature book in the Fairy Castle Library is a dictionary on a lectern that Charles Morrison gave his daughter when she was five years old, long before they set about building the Fairy Castle.[204]  Mrs. Hargrave recounted in Colleen Moore’s Doll House, the book collection began with a collection of sixty-five 18th Century volumes on religious subjects in English and French.[205]  She described them as being “exquisitely bound in leather, velum, and gilt, and clearly legible.”[206]  The average size of a book in the Fairy Castle Library is one square inch, although there are also pocket-sized editions for fairies, too.[207] The miniature Bible is often described as the smallest Bible in the world and the size of a baby’s thumbnail.[208]  It is a copy of the entire New Testament, and to read it one would need a magnifying glass.[209]   Spanish-American actor-director Antonio Moreno (1887-1967), one of Colleen Moore’s leading men, gave her this copy of the Bible in 1927.[210]  In the Library, one would also find a miniature copy of the Koran.[211]

 

These little books are rare and hard to find, and I decided to add some modern editions to the library.  I had a series of leather-bound books made, one inch square, stamped in gold, with rigid spines and blank pages.  In these miniatures I have asked twentieth-century writers to put down whatever they choose in their own handwriting.[212]

 

They include hand-printed excerpts from John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men, Agatha Christie’s At Bertram’s Hotel, and Willa Cather’s Shadow on the Rock.[213]  The Agatha Christie volume measures 1 ⅛” x ¾”.[214] Novelist, playwright, and short story-writer Sinclair Lewis (1885-1951) wrote about Dr. Martin Arrowsmith, the anti-hero of Arrowsmith, published in 1925, in Hollywood trying to break into the movie business.[215]  Journalist, novelist, and screenwriter Adela Rogers St. Johns (1894-1988) shared an anecdote about her father, the celebrated lawyer Earl Rogers (1869-1922) from her biography of him, Final Verdict, published in 1962.[216]  [Notably, Adela Rogers St. Johns wrote the first story that turned into the film What Price Hollywood? (1932), which was inspired by Colleen Moore’s first marriage with producer John McCormick.]  Dame Daphne du Maurier (1907-1989), Lady Browning, an authoress and playwright and wife of Lieutenant-General Sir Frederick Browning (1896-1965), wrote the famous first sentence from her novel Laura, published in 1938, “Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again.”[217]  The aforementioned Hendrik van Loon painted twelve water colors that depicted “the story of mankind.” [218]  Poet and environmentalist Robinson Jeffers (1887-1962) wrote a poem.[219]  Playwright Edward F. Albee III (1928-2016) wrote dialogue from A Delicate Balance, published in 1966 in a volume that measures 1 ⅛” x 1”.[220]  Other authors who contributed hand-printed works in these volumes were Sir Noël Coward (1899-1973), Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Edna Ferber (1885-1965), F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), Elinor Glyn (1864-1943), William Randolph Hearst (1863-1951), Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), Anita Loos (1889-1981), Clare Boothe Luce, and Thornton Wilder (1897-1975).[221]

In 1937, Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950) contributed a fully-illustrated book, Tarzan, Jr.  It is so lavishly illustrated that I would say it is a forerunner of the graphic novels that comic book companies publish now.  Colleen Moore’s memory was somewhat inaccurate when she wrote that Edgar Rice Burroughs wrote and illustrated the book,[222] as the illustrations were provided by John Coleman (“Jack”) Burroughs (1913-1979), the second son (and third child overall) of Edgar Rice Burroughs.  Both men signed the book.

The most valuable book from the Library is not kept in the Library.  Nor is it kept on permanent display anywhere else in the Museum.  Rather, it is kept in the Museum of Science and Industry’s vault.[223]  This is Colleen Moore’s autograph album.[224]  She collected the autographs of six American presidents: Herbert Clark Hoover (1874-1964), Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945), Harry S. Truman (1884-1972), General of the Army Dwight David (“Ike”) Eisenhower (1890-1969), Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908-1973), and Richard Milhous Nixon (1913-1994).[225]  She, of course, wanted the autograph of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, but, as he was the second-youngest president to attain the presidency after Theodore Roosevelt, she thought she had all the time in the world to get it.[226]   The autograph album also contains the autographs of foreign heads-of-state and chiefs-of-state: Queen Elizabeth II and her consort Prince Philip; her uncle and aunt Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor (and formerly King Edward VIII), and Wallis (1896-1986), Duchess of Windsor; the aforementioned Crown Prince Akihito; (former British Prime Minister) Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965); (future French President) General Charles André Joseph Marie de Gaulle (1890-1970); (founding Polish Premier) Ignace Paderewski (1860-1941); and (founding Indian Premier) Jawaharlal Nehru (1889-1964).[227]   In addition to Eisenhower, American general officers who signed it included General of the Armies of the United States John Joseph (“Black Jack”) Pershing (1860-1948), General of the Army (and Field Marshal of the Philippine Army) Douglas MacArthur (1880-1964), General Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright IV (1883-1953), Fleet Admiral Chester William Nimitz, Senior (1885-1965), and Rear Admiral Richard Evelyn Byrd (1885-1967).[228]   Conductor Arturo Toscanini (1867-1957), architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959), and artist Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) signed it.[229]  Airplane co-inventor Orville Wright (1871-1948), Ford Motor Company founder and assembly line production innovator Henry Ford (1863-1947), U.S. Marine Corps aviator, engineer, astronaut (and future U.S. Senator) Colonel John Herschel Glenn, Junior (1921-2016); and banker and philanthropist J.P. Morgan, Junior (1867-1943) signed it.[230]   Physicists Lise Meitner (1878-1968), Robert A. Millikan (1868-1953), Albert Einstein (1879-1955), and Arthur H. Compton (1892-1962) signed it, too.[231]   Two First Ladies who signed it were Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962) and Madame Chiang Kai-shek (1898-2003).[232]

In 1937, Henry Ford became the first celebrity to sign the autograph album.[233]  Colleen Moore was on a stop in Detroit during her national tour with the Fairy Castle when she received a phone call from Mrs. Henry (Clara) Ford.[234]  Mrs. Ford wanted to see the Fairy Castle and Colleen Moore assumed she wanted to bring her young grandchildren, but it was really Henry Ford who wanted to see it up close.[235]   He examined the Fairy Castle for two hours and then he enthusiastically signed the autograph album.[236]

The next year, Colleen Moore encountered Lord Halifax on a boat in the English Channel during a voyage from Paris to London.[237]  [Edward Frederick Lindley Wood (1881-1959), who was styled Lord Irwin from 1925 until 1934, Viscount Halifax from 1934 to 1944, and 1st Earl of Halifax from 1946 until his death, and served as Viceroy and Governor-General of India from 1926 to 1931, as Foreign Secretary from 1938 to 1940, and as Ambassador to the United States of America from 1941 to 1946.]  According to Colleen Moore, when he met the former movie star, Lord Halifax was on his way back to London from Munich with Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain (1869-1940), who had just signed the Munich Agreement with German Führer and Chancellor Adolph Hitler (1889-1945).[238]  He told her, “Tomorrow this may be a very bad name for your book.”[239]

In 1945, she asked her friend Edward Kelly (1876-1950), Mayor of Chicago (1933-1947), to get the signature of General de Gaulle, who was the head of the French Government-in-Exile.[240]  De Gaulle was a on a tour of the U.S.A. to get support and Mayor Kelly held a luncheon for him at the Palmer House (now the Palmer House Hilton).  , “I can understand why Churchill calls De Gaulle his Cross of Lorraine,” Kelly said of de Gaulle, who had left halfway through the speeches, when Kelly handed back the autograph album, he said.[241]  “He even signed your book upside down!”[242]

Ignacy Paderewski was a famous pianist and composer who had been the first Prime Minister and Foreign Minister of the Republic of Poland, and was on an American fundraising tour for Polish Relief when Colleen Moore obtained his signature.[243]  She attended his concert and approached his secretary during the intermission, and he told her that Paderewski was a fan of hers because she had made comedies and Paderewski, who was a resident of Switzerland, needed to laugh.[244]  Consequently, she was invited to coffee the next morning in the private railroad car of the former Polish premier in the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway yards.[245]  Ushered into his bedroom, she handed Paderewski her autograph album, who was lying in bed, and she felt in awe of the elderly musician-composer-statesman.[246]  Two weeks later, he was dead.[247]

Colleen Moore obtained the signature of Pablo Picasso while on a visit to Cannes with Homer Hargrave, Sr., through an intermediary.[248]  Their chauffeur overheard her complain to her husband that her efforts to get Picasso’s autograph had failed and he told her that his girlfriend was Picasso’s maid so she left the autograph album with him he could get it signed.[249]

Sir Winston Churchill, who was Prime Minister from 1940 to 1945 and from 1951 to 1955, was painting something he saw outside his window of his room at Waldorf Towers in New York City when he paused to sign the autograph album.[250]  [The grandson of John Winston Spencer-Churchill (1802-1883), 7th Duke of Marlborough, and son of Lord Randolph Henry Spencer-Churchill (1849-1895) and his American wife Jennie Spencer-Churchill (1854-1921), he was in his mother’s hometown at the time.]  Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip signed the autograph album when they visited the Museum of Science and Industry in 1959.[251]  To mark the occasion of M.S.I. being visited by Canada’s head of state (Queen Elizabeth II) and chief of state (Prime Minister John Diefenbaker) on July 6, 1959, booklets about the capture of the U-505 with personal greetings from Admiral Gallery, were bound, along with booklets about Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle, in white leather bound books on M.S.I., with gold-etched dedicatory inscriptions and white silk linings.[252] Major Lohr presented Queen Elizabeth & Prince Philip with one each for Prince Charles and Princess Anne. A third book was given to Prime Minister & Mrs. Diefenbaker. 

Jawaharlal Nehru signed the autograph album while he visited the Museum of Science and Industry with one of his sisters.[253]  Colleen Moore noted, “Nehru knew all the fairy tales represented in the castle and recognized the characters with delight.  He was more impressed with the castle’s diminutive size than with the splendor of its materials, for in India it is possible to see full-scale palaces walled with mother-of-pearl and imbedded with precious stones.”[254]

The mural in the Small Hall that leads from the Library to the Chapel is Love in Bloom, which depicts Noah surrounded by animal couples having debarked from Noah’s Ark.[255]  The artist was Alice O’Neill.[256]

 

The Chapel

Colleen Moore Fairy Castle @ the Museum of Science and Industry
Colleen Moore Fairy Castle @ the Museum of Science and Industry

Figure 20 Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: This is the Chapel from Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle as seen on May 19, 2014.  The papal seal is real.  It was a lost in an insurrection in 1870 and Colleen Moore purchased at auction.  The organ truly plays music (by remote control).

The Chapel is 2’6” x 4’.[257]  A statue of Saint Giles guards the door to the Chapel.[258]  Bayard de Volo designed and carved the inlaid ivory floor with gold Biblical symbols, which was inspired by a mosaic floor in an Italian palace.[259]  The symbols carved into the floor are allusions to the Lamb of God, the Dove of Peace, the Ram, the Locusts, and sheaves of wheats that represent the Years of Plenty, as well as the Ten Commandments from the Old Testament.[260]  Beneath the stained-glass windows, de Volo also carved an image of the Holy Grail into the floor.[261]  Helga Brabon (born in 1896) designed the Chapel’s stained-glass windows with Biblical stories beloved by children.[262] These are Old Testament stories of David and Goliath, Daniel in the Lions’ Den, Moses in the Bullrushes, and King Solomon.[263]  The pillars that support the vaulted ceiling have gold leaf with a grapevine motif.[264]  The embossed ceiling, also the work of Helga Brabon, was inspired by the Book of Kells.[265]  Colleen Moore had a deep appreciation of the Book of Kells, which she (accurately) described as a “beautifully illuminated manuscript of the Latin Gospels.”[266]  When she was a little girl, her grandmother told her about it and as an adult she was able to see the book for herself at Trinity College during a trip to Dublin (specifically to see the book) in 1926 while she was in London to film exterior shots for a film.[267]  “Of course it is impossible to produce any semblance of the sort of illumination done in ancient monasteries, but I love the ceiling very much,” Colleen Moore wrote.[268]

The gold and ivory organ has more than 100 keys, each of which is one-sixteenth-of-an-inch wide.[269]  The organ pipes are six-to-eleven-inches tall.[270]  They are flanked by bronze and gold pillars with bas-relief cherubs.[271]  Carved in Italy, the organ truly plays music (by remote control).[272]   Colleen Moore placed handwritten musical manuscripts on the organ that she acknowledged was secular but precious to her Firebird by Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971), Prelude by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943), Rhapsody in Blue by George Gershwin (1898-1937), The End of the Perfect Day by Carrie Jacobs-Bond (1862-1946), and The Land of the Sky Blue Water by Charles Wakefield Cadman (1881-1946).[273]

A gold sanctuary lamp, which Colleen Moore referred to as a vigil light, set with diamonds, sapphires, and rubies, contains a diamond that scintillates with light from six burning candles on either side.[274]  The diamond came from the engagement ring of Colleen Moore’s mother, which she left to her with instructions to use it in the Fairy Castle.[275]  A bejeweled icon of the Virgin hangs above it.[276]  In a free-standing gold frame in front of the pillar near the organ is what Colleen Moore described as “a primitive Italian painting of the Holy Family.”[277]

Before the altar are kneeling benches for the Prince and Princess.[278]  On one of these kneeling benches, one will find a miniature copy of the Bible that contains the entirety of the New Testament.[279]  The miniature Bible in the Fairy Castle’s Chapel is a real book printed by David Bryce (1845-1923) in Scotland in 1890.[280]  [Many of the books in the Library were printed by Bryce.[281]]  Colleen Moore stated, “The Bible lying on the prie-dieu is believed to be the smallest Bible ever printed from type… The Victorians had a passion for minutiae, and Bryce revived the printing of tiny books, mostly on religious subjects, in series.”[282]

Standing nearby is a 5 ⅛” x 1” ivory-and-glass vial Colleen Moore’s parents acquired in Italy contains a 300-year-old crucifix.[283]  It is under ¼” wide, yet under a magnifying glass one can see it is perfect in every detail.[284]   Colleen Moore wrote, “The incredible carving is so exquisitely done that the head of Christ, which is no larger than the head of a pin, under a magnifying glass has an expression of infinite sadness.”[285]

The throne is a copy of the wooden Coronation Chair (also known as King Edward’s Chair) in Westminster Abbey where, successively, English and British monarchs have been crowned.[286]  It even had a copy of the Stone of Scone underneath.[287]  Before King Edward I  (lived 1239-1307, reigned 1272-1307), the Hammer of the Scots, conquered Scotland, and stole the Stone of Scone, kings and high kings of Scotland sat on the Stone of Scone when they were crowned.

What appears to be a 6 ¼” x 1 ½” bust of Pope Pius IX (lived 1792-1878, reigned 1846-1878) is actually his seal (which can be seen under the bust).[288]  In 1870, during the reign of Pope Pius IX, there was an insurrection in the Apostolic Palace and this seal was one of several objects that disappeared.[289]  An American woman acquired it and she bequeathed it to a relative in Boston.  Colleen Moore acquired it at auction in Boston.[290]

“The carved gold altar is devoted to children,” Colleen Moore explicated.  “This altar was designed and carved long before I ever thought of taking the castle on tour for children’s charities.”[291]  At the center of the altar is a 4” x 1 ½” x 1 ½” gold monstrance (also known as an ostensorium) designed by New York City jeweler David Webb (1925-1975).[292]  Often, Roman Catholics, Old Catholics, and high-church Anglicans use a monstrance to display consecrated Eucharistic host for Eucharistic adoration, but sometimes they use it as a reliquary, and in this case it is a reliquary, an object that contains a relic of a saint for the veneration of that saint.  The Fairy Castle itself and most of its contents are artifacts but it also contains an object of entirely different character, a relic that to Catholics is precious beyond measure.  It contains a shard of the True Cross that Clare Boothe Luce (1903-1987) donated in honor of her late daughter and only child, Ann Clare Brokaw (1924-1944), who had died in an automobile accident at the age of nineteen.[293]  While Mrs. Luce was Ambassador to Italy, Pope Pius XII gave her a gold medallion inside of which was a shard of the cross upon which Christ was crucified almost 2,000 years ago.[294]  When Mrs. Luce was on a visit to Chicago to see Mrs. (Philip) Helen Atwater Wrigley (1901-1977), Colleen Moore took them for a private viewing of the Fairy Castle during which the exhibit (if not the Museum of Science and Industry as a whole) was closed to the public.[295]  As they listened to the organ play in the Chapel, Mrs. Luce tearfully told Colleen Moore about the medallion and that she wanted to give it to go in the Chapel in memory of her daughter.[296]  The monstrance is flanked by statues of angels with outspread wings.[297]  Behind the altar is a miniature copy of Correggio’s Holy Family.[298]

To the right of the altar is the sacristy, where one will find the gold baptismal font, set with sapphires.[299]  Behind the baptismal font is a stained-glass screen.[300]  This is a piece of a window from Lambeth palace, the residence of the Archbishops of Canterbury, which was blown out during the London Blitz (the long aerial attack on London by the Luftwaffe during the Second Great World War), which her friend Judy Keele discovered and presented to Colleen Moore for use in the Fairy Castle.[301]  In this area, one will also find the pulpit with carved figures of the Apostles.[302]  The 1 ⅝” x 1 ⅜” Russian icon set with emeralds and diamonds above the pulpit was fashioned from a brooch Colleen Moore purchased in an antique shop.[303]  Another copy of the Bible is resting on the lectern, this one illustrated with images from the Old Testament.[304]

 

The Drawing Room

 

Colleen Moore Fairy Castle @ the Museum of Science and Industry
Colleen Moore Fairy Castle @ the Museum of Science and Industry

Figure 21 Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: This is the Drawing Room from Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle as seen on May 19, 2014.

On the opposite end of the Great Hall from the Chapel is the 2’3” x 3’3”Drawing Room.[305]  At the behest of Colleen Moore, Yamanaka in New York City commissioned craftsmen in Beijing to create the quartz and jade Drawing Room floor, which took nine months to complete and send to the U.S.A.[306]  Beverly Hills jeweler H.B. Crouch fashioned the chandelier out of gold, diamonds, pearls, and emeralds.[307]  The electric lightbulbs are each the size of grain of wheat.[308]  George Townsend Cole (1874-1937) produced the murals that relay the story of Cinderella that adorn the walls.[309]  He often came to see the Fairy Castle when it was under construction and asked to decorate the walls.[310]  This room contains silver furniture with needlepoint upholstery.[311]

A master craftsman fabricated the rosewood violin and violin.[312]  According to the 1949 guidebook, the rosewood grand piano has ivory legs,[313] but that is not true of the piano now in the Drawing Room.  The piano in there now, at least, measures 2 ¾” x 6 ¼” x 3”.[314]  It has handwritten manuscripts of “Rhapsody in Blue” by George Gershwin (1898-1937), “Alexander’s Ragtime Band” by Irving Berlin (1888-1989), and “Over There” by George M. Cohan (1878-1949).[315]  Richard Rodgers (1902-1972) contributed “Oh, What a Beautiful Morning” from Oklahoma.[316]  George (“Buddy”) DeSylva (1895-1950) contributed “California Here I Come.”[317]

Colleen Moore Fairy Castle @ the Museum of Science and Industry
Colleen Moore Fairy Castle @ the Museum of Science and Industry

Figure 22 Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: This is a detail from the Drawing Room of Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle as seen on May 19, 2014.  We see here part of a mural by George Townsend Cole (1874-1937) a chair, footrest, desk, and sculpture, and flowers.

 

In the opposite corner from the fireplace, on the same side of the Drawing Room as the doorway that leads into the Great Hall, is a concealed stairway that leads up the second floor.[318]  It is flanked by two intricately carved rococo-style pillars that allude to German fairy tales. [319]

In one corner of the Drawing Room, one will find a large fireplace with its glowing fire. [320] In front of this fireplace is an ivory table on top of which rests a complete chess set.[321]  The largest of these carved chess pieces is one-sixteenth of an inch high. [322]  The whole chess table and chess set combination is shorter than a single chess piece from a standard-sized set.[323]  It is 1 ½” x 1 ⅞” x 1 ½”.[324] On the fireplace mantel rests a clock with diamonds and emeralds which Cinderella was supposed to watch while she danced at the royal ball.[325] The bejeweled mantle clock measures ⅞” 1 ¼” x ¼”.[326]  The aforementioned James Montgomery Flagg drew the portrait of Colleen Moore in a 1 ⅞” x ¾” silver frame on the table.[327]

In 1949, the Drawing Room included a console radio that could receive transmissions from Chicago’s radio stations, despite being under three inches tall.[328]  This was installed so the fairy occupants of the Fairy Castle could “keep up with the modern world.”[329]

Along one wall, between the doorway to the Great Hall and the fireplace, stands a 4 ¼” x 2 ⅛” x 1 ¼”  silver secretary desk at one end of the Drawing Room has an ivory statuette of mythical Swiss revolutionary William Tell. [330]  When Mrs. Hargrave wrote Colleen Moore’s Doll House, she suggested to photographer Will Rousseau that they leave their mark, with the result that he made scaled-down photographs of them, and she chose to have her framed portrait placed on the silver table.[331] On the other side of the doorway to the Great Hall, between the doorway and the stairs, is a 6 ⅛” x 2 ½” x 1 ⅜” silver “Hickory Dickory Dock” themed grandfather clock.[332]

Over the other doorway, which leads to the Dining Room, are lions rampant that uphold the escutcheon (heraldic shield) of King Arthur. [333]   Having King Arthur’s (purported) coat of arms above the doorway foreshadows the Arthurian theme of the Dining Room.  This doorway is flanked by amber vases that are over 500 years old.[334]  These vases belonged to the Dowager Empress of China.[335]  This is probably a reference to Cixi, who is often referred to (in English) as the Empress Dowager Grand Empress Dowager.[336]

 

The Dining Room

 

The Dining Room features marble walls and an inlaid walnut floor. [337]  The pilasters have Corinthian capitals.[338]  Sixty-four concealed light fixtures in the rafted ceiling illuminate the room. [339]  The marble walls are adorned by five tapestries that depict the deeds of the Knights of the Round Table.[340]  The semi-circular walnut table is supposed to be King Arthur’s Round Table.[341]  It is set for King Arthur, Queen Guinevere, and twelve of his knights.[342]  Colleen Moore was partially mistaken when she wrote, “Research indicates that Camelot itself was a fantasy – that Arthur and Guinevere and the unforgettable knights were creatures of the imagination celebrated in sagas sung by medieval minstrels,”[343] because Arthur and his son were real people, attested to by Nennius in Historia Brittonum, but Camelot and the other characters in Welsh and Breton folklore, the medieval ballads of the minstrels, and modern fantasy novels are fictional.  The coat of arms of King Arthur, Queen Guinevere and each knight is emblazoned on the back of his or her 5 ⅜” x 3’ x 2” wooden chair.[344]  In reference to Queen Guinevere’s affair with Sir Lancelot, Colleen Moore pointed out King Arthur’s heraldic device on his chair depicts his sword Excalibur and a broken heart, Queen Guinevere’s depicts two hearts entwined, and Sir Lancelot’s has “double cross and a snake in the grass.”[345]  The service is solid gold. [346]   Each place is set with a plate, goblet, and wine glass. [347]   The gold plates were gifts of Colleen Moore’s parents, while the gold forks, knives, and spoons were gifts from her brother, Cleve Palmer Morrison (1904-1954),[348] who acted under the name Cleve Moore.  The knives are just ½” long, yet they bear her monogram.[349]  The Bristol wine glasses were over 100 years old by 1971.[350]  The gold goblets were made in Mexico.[351]  A walnut sideboard holds a silver serving tray, along with a Bristol glass decanter and tumblers. [352]   By 1971, the Waterford glass decanter had been made in Ireland over a hundred years previously.[353]  A Battersea enamel wine keg stands nearby. [354]   A buffet on the far ends has a collection of gold teapots, an ivory chocolate set, and a breakfast set of Royal Cauldon china, painting with a Greek key motif. [355]   The gold teapots were once part of one of Colleen Moore’s charm bracelets.[356]  The egg cups are the size of matchheads. [357]  They are so small, they were painted with a single hair from a paintbrush.[358]

There are five tapestries depicting the Knights of the Round Table hanging above the arches in the Dining Room.[359]  Colleen Moore commissioned them specifically for the Fairy Castle and they were handmade in the atelier Madam Jorey had in Vienna during the interwar years.[360]    The scale is 2,500 stitches to the square inch.[361]    Only two women at her workshops were capable of such fine needlework.[362]  The tapestries were hung in 1935.[363]

 

The Kitchen

 

The 2’3” x 1’9” Kitchen has a Mother Goose theme.[364]  The walls are decorated with murals that depict Jack and Jill, Little Jack Horner, Contrary Mary, Little Bo-Peep, Humpty Dumpty, Puss in Boots, the Lazy Grasshopper, and the Three Little Pigs.[365]  The legs of the kitchen table are shaped and painted to represent the King and Queen of Hearts.[366]  Colleen Moore related, “The purple wineglass on the table is the sole surviving memento of my first doll house.  One of a set of six, it decorated the cigar-box dining room of the house my father and mother built for me when I was two.”[367]  The Three Blind Mice on the stool were carved out of ivory.[368]  Some of the Mexican pieces of pottery are hundreds of years old.[369]  Some of the works of glass were made in a suburb of Guadalajara, where artisans handed down the tradition of working with glass within families for generations.[370]  By 1949, the Kitchen contained a table with “a complete dinner set of Royal Doulton china, each piece bearing the crest of Mary, the Dowager Queen of England.”[371]  [This would be the aforementioned Mary of Teck for whom Queen Mary’s Doll House was built.]  Colleen Moore explained the “Royal Doulton dinner service… [was] an exact replica of the service made for the fabled doll house, in Windsor Castle, of the late Queen Mary of England.”[372]  Copper skillets and other utensils hang on a 6 ½” x 6 ¼” x 2” rack.[373]  The coffee pot measures 1 ½” x ⅞”.[374]A 1 ⅝” x 1” x ⅝” cookbook in the kitchen had recipes from famous chefs.[375]  The copper cook stove is like the one in which the wicked witch locked Hansel and Gretel,” noted Colleen Moore.[376]

 

 

THE SECOND FLOOR

 

Above the Kitchen is a storeroom on the second floor that provides storage space for additional pieces of china, glassware, and silver.[377]  A mural that depicts the Wicked Witch riding on a broomstick guards the chests of silver.[378]  This storeroom also contains a tool rack so fairy servants can make minor repairs to the Fairy Castle for the Prince and Princess.[379]   A mural of Mistress Mary Quite Contrary guards the tool rack.[380]

Above the Library, is a treasury with an Ali Baba theme, identified in 1935 Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World as the “strong-room,” in 1949 in The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle as the “Treasure Room,” and by Mrs. Hargrave in 1971 in Colleen Moore’s Doll House as the “Cave of Ali Baba.”[381]  The Cave of Ali Baba measures 8” x 1’6”.[382]  The fairy who wanted to enter the Treasure Room would be able to do so only through a trapdoor.[383]  The windows are barred.[384]  The jeweled decanters are supposed to contain love potions.[385]  The rings, of course, are also magical.[386]  Colleen Moore revealed, “Unlike the other jewels in the castle, these are genuinely make-believe and suffer by comparison.”[387]

 

The Bedroom of the Prince

      The 2’3” x 2’ Bedroom of the Prince is bronze with enameled deep blue walls and ceiling with gold frescos.[388]  Colleen Moore pointed out, “The Bedroom of the Prince is the only room in the castle not cast in aluminum.  It is cast in bronze.”[389]  She had wanted the room to be made in Russia after she learnt about a community of icon-makers on the Volga River, but this plan did not work out and she settled for having the room painted Russian blue and having the bed and chairs carved in such a way as to carry out the theme of Little Czar Saltar.[390]  This seems to be a reference to the young hero of the opera The Tale of Czar Saltan by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844-1908), which was derived from the poem The Ballad of Tsar Saltan, of His Son the Renowned and Mighty Bogatyr Prince Gvidon Saltanovich, and of the Beautiful Swan-Princess by Aleksandr Pushkin (1799-1837).  When Colleen Moore was young, it was common to transliterate the title of the opera as The Legend of Tsar Saltar.[391]  The theme of the room is a Russian fairytale about a witch turning a young prince into a goat.[392]  Four pillars with quasi-Corinthian order capitals uphold the frescoed ceiling.[393]  A mesh screen hides the balcony that overlooks the Great Hall, which separates the Bedroom of the Prince from the Bedroom of the Princess.[394]  On the balcony is a Dresden vase purchased in Vienna. [395]  Its companion, inside the Bedroom of the Prince, was purchased years later in Paris.[396]   According to the 1935 guide book, the solid gold chests of drawers were made in China, hence the dragon motif etched onto them.[397]   According to the 1949 book, the artisans who made the chests of solid gold were Japanese.[398]  Colleen Moore explained that there were three Japanese-made chests of “gold inlaid with silver and iron.”[399] The small one was over 500 years old, the middle one was over 150 years old, and she commissioned the fabrication of the large one in Kyoto in 1935.[400]  She had it made with allusions of Japanese fairy tales.[401]  It was the handiwork of a family who had been in the trade for generations.[402]  Near one chest are the legendary Seven-League Boots.[403]  On one side of the room, the visitor would find the Prince’s collection of solid gold canon and swords. [404]  The Prince himself is supposed to have killed the polar bear the visitor would find on the floor.[405]  [Really a taxidermist turned an ermine into a facsimile of a bear rug, a feat that took a dozen attempts.[406]  According to the 1935 guidebook, the “bear” teeth are made of ivory.[407]  Mrs. Hargrave stated the teeth had formerly belonged to a mouse.[408]]  The Prince’s walnut bed has a headboard that refers to the Russian prince and the footboard refers to the witch.[409]  Colleen Moore stated that the 3 ⅝” x 1” sword propped up against the footboard of the Prince’s bed was Excalibur, and the ¼” x 1” gold shoes were the Prince’s running shoes.[410]  The silver halberd measures 5 ¼” x 1 ¼” in its stand.[411]  The armoire measures 7” x 3 ⅝” x 1”.[412]  The chairs in the Prince’s bedroom have legs shaped like a goat’s.[413]

One wall has a miniature replica of The Madonna.  In the 1935 publication Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, his first name was spelt Raymon Martinez.[414]  The 1949 guidebook spelt the Mexican artist’s name Ramon Martinez.[415]  Mrs. Hargrave elucidated, “Over the prie-dieu in this room hangs a remarkable picture of the Virgin of Guadalupe, painted on copper by Ramos Martínez’s young daughter was stricken with polio and seemed doomed to never walk.  Her father made a pilgrimage to the Shrine of Guadalupe near Mexico City and vowed that if his daughter recovered, he would honor the Virgin at every opportunity through his art.  The child regained her health and mobility.  When Martínez heard that I was planning to take the castle on a nationwide tour for the benefit of children’s hospitals, he asked to be permitted to paint a portrait of the Virgin for the castle.  This exquisite miniature was the result.  It has been viewed by more than thirty million people.”[416]  The artist she described seems to have been Alfredo Ramos Martínez (1871-1946), a Mexican painter who settled in the U.S.A. after the Mexican Civil War.  His daughter had a congenital bone disease, which prompted him to paint the Madonna and Child and Our Lady of Guadalupe many times.  He made paintings to decorate the chapel of the Hotel-Casino Playa Ensenada in Ensenada, Baja California and painted the murals of The Chapel of the Santa Barbara Cemetery (1934) in Santa Barbara, California.  Harold Grieve purchased several of his paintings in 1936.

 

The Prince’s Bathroom

      The Bathroom of the Prince measures 1’9” x 1’.[417]  The bathroom walls and bathtub are made of alabaster.[418]  The bathtub is in the shape of a Chinese lily, albeit a stylized one.[419]  According to the 1935 and 1949 guidebooks, two lions guarded the bathtub.[420]  By the time Colleen Moore’s Doll House was published in 1971, there were two turquoise figures on shelves that flanked the tub and there were two turquoise frogs that flanked the tub on the stairs that led up to the tub.[421]  Further, although the 1949 guidebook stated the lions were present, the photograph of the Prince’s Bathroom that appeared in that guidebook showed the frogs rather than the lions.[422]  Two mermaids with gold tails hold seashells out of which water constantly pours into the tub.[423]  Hidden lights illuminate the water. [424]  The proscenium arch is made of gold and mother-of-pearl.[425]  The golden lavatory has fish-shaped faucets.[426]

According to the 1949 guidebook, the razor was also of gold.[427]  The Bathroom of the Prince, by 1971, had a gold chest with inlaid iron and silver, on top of which rested the Prince’s razor, which had a steel blade.[428]

The gold shell-shaped wash basin rested on the vertical tails of dolphins.[429]  The water faucets were also shaped like dolphins.[430]  Above the wash basin was a gold mirror mounted on the wall, at the center of which was a sapphire encircled by diamonds, which came from a ring Colleen Moore’s grandmother had given her. [431]

The Bedroom of the Princess

      The Bedroom of the Princess measures 2’3” x 3’.[432]  “The Fairy Princess became so real to us that we would speak of her in the most intimate terms,” Colleen Moore wrote of her father and herself.  “We felt we actually could see her, although we each saw her differently.  This is why there are no figures in the house.  I wanted those viewing the castle to people it with the fairy-tale characters of their imaginations, not mine.  In this way the house comes to life for everyone.”[433]

The floor in the bedroom of the Princess is comprised of mother-of-pearl cubes with a border of inlaid gold.[434]  Colleen Moore wrote, “When my father and I pondered the choice of a material for the floor, of the Bedroom of the Princess, I thought of Sleeping Beauty’s tiny bare feet running across the floor from her golden bed to her ivory dressing table.  What floor material would be elegant enough?”[435]

Gold was too hard, silver too cold, wood too common.  What could we use?  The only answer was mother-of-pool.  And I must say she loves it.[436]

The walls are seashell pink.[437] Above the door is a painting of Peter Pan dancing on a mushroom.[438]  The room is illuminated by two chandeliers and through stained-glass windows in the tradition of Gothic-style churches that are along the back wall.[439]

The chairs in the Bedroom of the Princess is model Battersea enamel chairs, footstool, and settee, which Colleen Moore acquired after a twenty-five-year-long search.[440]  The Battersea enamel chairs in the Bedroom of the Princess are part of a set represented throughout the Fairy Castle that Colleen Moore’s aunts brought to her from Paris when she was a child.[441]  She found the matching sofa in an antique shop in New Orleans after a search that ended fifteen years before she wrote Colleen Moore’s Doll House.[442]

The pair of diamond-and-emerald chairs were formerly dress clips of Colleen Moore’s.[443]  They were made by a jeweler in Des Moines, Iowa, where the Fairy Castle was once displayed.[444]  These platinum chairs set with diamonds have green cloisonné seats and backs the jeweler fashioned from two emerald-and-diamond clips Colleen Moore formerly wore on her lapel.[445]

Most of the objects on the 3 ½” x 2 ¾” x 1 ¼” three-tiered Battersea shelving unit were donated by miniature collectors.[446]  For example, Colleen Moore related, a lady from Philadelphia donated the “purple Bristol cream jug and crystal bowl” and when Colleen Moore attempted to compensate her, the lady explained that was unnecessary because she had no heirs to appreciate them and for years had searched to give them the right home.[447]  There was a similar story behind the pair of ⅞” x ¾” Staffordshire lambs, which were a gift from a collector in Boston.[448]

When the 1935 guidebook was published, the crown of the Princess was on a gold chest in her bedroom.[449]  Back then, one would also see here a gold pitcher on the table that was a model of America’s Cup,[450] a.k.a. the Auld Mug, the award given to the winner of an international sailing yacht race.  Two stained-glass windows overlook the Magic Garden.[451]

An orchid enamel canopy covers the boat-shaped bed with its solid gold lines.[452]  Mrs. Hargrave wrote, “The boat-shaped bed with diadem canopy, which must have belonged to Sleeping Beauty, is made of gold and the bedspread is the golden spider web that covered her during her hundred years’ wait for Prince Charming’s kiss.”[453]

Sculptures of angels with outspread wings hold open the canopy.  A golden peacock stands atop the headboard.  There is an imperial crown at the foot of the bed.  There is a sculpture of a page in a tunic and Phrygian cap asleep as he leans against a shield with two red hearts on a white field, standing in front of the foot of the bed.[454]

In 1935, the gold slippers of the Princess rested on a pillow of seed pearls.[455]  By 1949, the golden slippers rested “on the tiniest hooked rug ever made.[456]  An Italian shoemaker who saw the Fairy Castle on display at the R.H. Macy & Company department store in New York City made the one-quarter-of-an-inch-long red satin slippers with hand-sewn leather soles, which hang on a hook by the bed.[457]  He told her, “I must make the smallest pair of shoes in the world for her little feet.”[458]  I found it interesting that he had the same concern she did for the bare dainty feet of a fairy princess.

Near the golden slippers, at least between 1935 and 1949, was a “magic spinnet of carved ivory,”[459] spinnet being an antiquated spelling of spinet, an English word derived from the Italian word spinetta, and describes a small, compact harpsichord; a small, upright piano; or small organ.  [The Italian word is derived Giovanni Spinetti, a Venetian musical instrument maker and inventor.]  The spinnet, which Ms. Neff identified as an upright piano, measures 3 ¾” x 1 ½” x 2 ½”.[460]  The spinning wheel measures 4 ½” x 2” x 2”.[461]  The Princess also has a collection silver guitars and mandolins[462] (the way the Prince has a collection of gold weapons).  These musical instruments were produced a by a single Austrian master craftsman.[463]  By 1949, the Bedroom of the Princess had a gold harp, a gold lyre, and gold guitars and a cage for the Blue Bird of Happiness.[464]  The bird and its pure gold cage were a gift from the Blue Bird Society of Dallas, Texas.[465]

The smallest toilet set in the world, the product of Florentine jeweler Guglielmo Cini (1922-1979), rested on an ivory dresser by 1946.[466]  [Mr. Cini emigrated from the Kingdom of Italy to the U.S.A. in 1922, and lived successively in Boston, Laguna Beach, and Los Angeles.  He lived in Boston at the time Colleen Moore gave him the commission to fabricate the toilet set, which is why she referred to him as “Gugielmo Cini, the Boston jewelry designer.”[467]]  This toilet set consisted of a ¾” long brush of gold set with diamonds with bristles of silver fox hair, a comb, a mirror, a nail file, and a gold jewelry box with a diamond crest that contains the wedding ring of the Princess.[468]  Colleen Moore revealed Cini had a difficult time finding “bristles fine enough to produce the brush in scale.  Human hair was too course.”[469]   He ultimately clipped “white guard hairs at the edge of the fur” from his wife’s silver fox fur scarf.[470]  The mirror and brush each have platinum crown on its back and a diamond-encrusted platinum handle.[471]  When he presented the toilet set to Colleen Moore, he told her to open the jewelry box to find his gift to the Princess.  She turned the one-sixteenth-of-an-inch key in the lock, opened the jewelry box, and “found a platinum engagement ring with a full-cut diamond in a Tiffany setting.”[472]  After an exhaustive search, Cini had discovered “the smallest full-cut diamond in existence” in the Netherlands.[473]   “It weighs one half a point,” she explained.  “The ring is so small it won’t slide down an ordinary pin.” [474]  Will Rousseau, the photographer who illustrated Colleen Moore’s Doll House, chose to have the scaled-down photograph of himself placed on the dressing table of the Princess.[475]

The amount of space is tales to convey scale model interiors can be deceptive, Colleen Moore elucidated.  “The bedroom is very spacious.  It is almost two feet long and one and a half feet wide.  In miniature rooms, height must be overscaled to produce the illusion of reality.  This ceiling looks about fourteen inches high, while in reality it is twenty-four inches.”[476]  Allusions to fairy tales are painted on the domed ceiling and walls.[477]

The Bathroom of the Princess

The Princess has a private bathroom like the Prince.  It measures 2’ x 1’9”.[478]  Hers has a carved glass wall etched with allusions to the water sprite Undine at the back of the room.[479]  The Princess has a crystal and jade-green bathtub.[480]  Real water flows from silver spigots.[481]  Perfumes and oils fill the bottles and jars on the steps that lead up to the bathtub.[482]  Six octagonal crystal pillars uphold the ceiling.[483]  One wall supports a six-sided mirror.[484]  Concealed lights illuminate the water that pours continually into the tub.[485]   Between 1935 and 1949, at least, the water flowed from sea shells held by two silver cupids standing on silver seahorses.[486]   By the time Colleen Moore’s Doll House was published, however, these had been replaced with spigots that were shaped like dolphins standing on their heads, braced by the wings of swans.[487]  A solid gold perfume cabinet is mounted on a wall.[488]

The Princess has two balconies. [489]    One overlooks the garden wall.[490]    The other overlooks the Prince’s Library.[491]

The Attic

By 1970, Endre Vitez, Sr., Museum of Science and Industry staff artist and preparator, had designed and built the Attic.[492]    Colleen Moore noted Mr. Vitez had “given the castle his special attention for the last fifteen years.  He has strong theories about the place looking cluttered, and the attic was his solution.”[493]

Shelves have been built to accommodate extras dishes and vases.  Extra chairs, a large silver sofa, and several Battersea stools have been moved to the attic and are brought down only for special occasions.  Rumpelstiltskin’s spinning wheel is suspended from the ceiling.  A silver samisen is stored here, because there didn’t seem to be a logical place for it downstairs.[494]

The spinning wheel with which Rumpelstiltskin spun straw into gold hangs from the ceiling.[495]  Born in Transylvania in 1919, Endre Vitez, Sr. was a Hungarian immigrant who learnt his own style of sculpting whilst making wooden icons for churches and painting murals for cafés in Germany before he emigrated to the U.S.A. in 1952 and settled in Chicago with his wife, Margit, and their children.[496]  He made ceramics at Carson, Pirie, Scott department store on State Street[497] and exhibited wooden sculptures at the Guildhall Galleries on Michigan Avenue,[498] restored Saint Anne of the Lemon Tree painting at St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church at 5472 South Kimbark Avenue in Hyde Park,[499] and maintained exhibits at the Museum of Science and Industry, including the Fairy Castle,[500] model ships,[501] and G.M.’s Motorama exhibit, which was formerly adjacent to Yesterday’s Main Street.[502]

 

 

If You like Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle, You Also May like…

The other thing at the Museum of Science and Industry that leaves people feeling warm and fuzzy is the Chick Hatchery, also known as the Baby Chick Hatchery. The Chick Hatchery started out in Food for Life in 1954 but is now in Genetics.[503]

1526448_10151997383432882_5549700616032370318_nFigure 23 Credit: Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago Caption: The Chick Hatchery or Baby Chick Hatchery is one of the most beloved exhibits at the Museum of Science and Industry.

 

If you enjoy looking at Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle, you may also enjoy viewing the Swiss Jolly Roller in the Lower Court in the Central Pavilion on the Lower Level (ground floor) against the wall behind the escalators and stairs, Circus in the East Gallery on the Lower Level, model ships in the Ships Gallery in the West Gallery on the Lower Level, the LEGO models of Cinderella’s Castle and the Palace of Fine Arts in Brick by Brick in the Central Pavilion  on the Main Level (second floor); and The Great Train Story in the Transportation Gallery (East Court) in the Central Pavilion on the Main Level.

Jolly Ball-73Figure 24 Credit: J.P. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: This is the Swiss Jolly Roller in the Lower Court in the Museum of Science and Industry’s Central Pavilion.

 

      Ships Gallery, presented by Captain Dave Truitt, consists of almost fifty model ships that underwent conservation in 2016 and gained new dioramas.  There have been several versions of this exhibit, which has existed longer than the building has been open.  It may fairly be said to be the brainchild of one of the original five curators hired by M.S.I. Executive Director Waldemar Kaempffert (1877-1956) in 1928, Seabury Colum Gilfillan (1889-1987), a civil engineer who later earned a doctorate. His titles were Curator of Transportation & Communication (1928), Curator of Social Sciences and Water Transport (1929), and Curator of Ships (1929).  For part of 1929, Gilfillan shared responsibility for Water Transportation Section with a fellow civil engineer, Fred A. Lippold.  A German naval architect, Lippold had worked at the Deutsches Museum as a model-maker before he came to M.S.I. as Curator of Civil Engineering & Public Works.  At some point in ‘29, Lippold succeeded Gilfillan as Curator of Shipbuilding & Navigation.  In mid-1931, upon Lippold’s resignation, Major Carlos de Zafra, Sr., Professor of Engineering at New York University, succeeded him, on a short-term basis, as Curator of Shipbuilding & Navigation.  On June 11, 1958, the M.S.I. announced that when the U.S. Navy exhibit (that would ultimately be called Seapower) opened, which occurred on July 3, 1959, the M.S.I. would simultaneously open Corridor of Model Ships.  On Tuesday, February 4, 1964, during the annual dinner meeting at the M.S.I. of the Chicago Council of the Navy League, Assistant Secretary of the Navy Kenneth E. BeLieu (1914-2001) and Orville Taylor, Chairman of the A. Montgomery Ward Foundation, unveiled Ships Through the Ages.  On Wednesday, February 5, 1964, Ships Through the Ages opened to the public.

Ships_Conservation_0148Figure 25 Credit: J.P. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: A conservation team from Litas Lipriani performed conservation work on the model ships over a five-month-long period before the Ships Gallery reopened to the public on November 10, 2016.  Here, we see Inez Litas at work on July 19, 2016.

csm_Ships_Exhibit_Guests_0086__3bd1182c3a

Figure 26 Credit: J.P. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: Ships Gallery, presented by Captain Dave Truitt, consists of almost fifty model ships that underwent conservation in 2016 and gained new dioramas.

 

The current Circus exhibit is a vestige of a much larger Circus exhibit in the East Pavilion that was sponsored by Sears, Roebuck & Company.  [Sears had a close relationship with the M.S.I. because Sears President Julius Rosenwald (1862-1932) had founded the M.S.I.]  At the time Museum of Science and Industry: A Souvenir Guide was published, the Lower Level of the Easter Gallery – the corridor along which one finds the current Circus exhibit, the Conestoga wagon, and Eye Spy – was identified as the Imagination Station exhibit.  [Eye Spy, like Out of the Vault on the Main Level, is an eclectic mix of artifacts, but Eye Spy is more whimsical.]  The miniature animated Circus exhibit was designed, built, and animated by a single man, retired railroad foreman Roland J. Weber, who carved many of the wooden pieces himself.[504]  He called it the “Terrell Jacobs Wild Animal Circus” in honor of his friend, Terrell Jacobs (1903-1957) (“The Lion King”), a famous circus animal-trainer.[505] In 1949, it was displayed in the Chicago Public Library (as in the central library that is now the Chicago Cultural Center), and three department stores: Marshall Field & Company, Boston, and Goldblatt’s.[506]  By 1952, Weber had been working on it for twenty-three years and it was comprised of 20,000 pieces.[507]  Each wagon had about 400 parts.[508]  The Big Top performers had an audience of 5,000 individually-carved spectators in reserved seats and bleachers.[509]  It took Weber and his wife five days to setup his animated circus on a twenty-by-thirty-nine-foot platform on the fourth floor of the Rosenbaum Brothers Department Store in Cumberland, Maryland.[510]  Weber toured with it in the Midwest and Maryland for years before he sold it in 1960.  Ken Idle of Rivergrove, Illinois acquired it and in 1970 sold it to Sears,[511] as part of a much larger toy collection, part of which, the M.B. Mervis collection of wooden horses known as “Horses of the World Collection,” ended up in the Kentucky Horse Park’s International Museum of the Horse.  It was no easy task to reanimate the “Terrell Jacobs Wild Animal Circus” because nobody trying to do so had seen it in operation.[512]  Once all 142 crates were unpacked, it took six weeks to reorganize and reanimate the Circus.[513]   It then took twenty-five workmen to reinforce old parts, repaint old circus wagons, re-clothe old figures, and make new figures.[514]   Alexander Cranstoun of the New York design firm DeMartin, Marona, Cranstoun, Downes, Inc. designed the original exhibit.[515]  After two years of restoration and construction, it opened on Sunday, April 15, 1973.[516]  Robert Lewis Parkinson, Chief Librarian and Historian at the Circus World Museum, assisted with the exhibit and exhibit catalog The Circus: An Unforgettable Exhibit Presented by Sears, Roebuck and Co. at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago.[517] In 1989, the Collections Department at M.S.I. determined Circus has approximately 22,000 pieces.[518]

26229511_10156405693942437_7352901962316760080_nFigure 27 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: This is the front cover of the exhibit catalog The Circus: An unforgettable exhibit presented by Sears, Roebuck and Co. at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago.

26219694_10156405694057437_4003964817096978824_nFigure 28 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: This is a photograph of the miniature animated Circus at the Museum of Science and Industry from the exhibit catalog The Circus: An unforgettable exhibit presented by Sears, Roebuck and Co. at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago.

 

 

 

      The Great Train Story replaced the Museum & Santa Fe Railroad in the Transportation Zone (now the Transportation Gallery) of the Museum’s Central Pavilion.   It opened on Friday, November 22, 2002. The 3,500 square-foot layout reproduces in miniature a railroad journey between Chicago and Seattle, and includes 1,425 feet of track. My friend, John C. Llewellyn, M.S.I. Exhibition Designer, was Chief Designer of The Great Train Story, and he had research support from former M.S.I. employee Jennifer Marjorie Johnston (Bosch). Sponsorship or material support came from the Mazza Foundation, The Burlington Northern & Santa Fe Railway Company (B.N.S.F.), the GATX Corporation, The Ferro Family, TranSystems Corporation, TTX Company, the Elizabeth Morse Genius Charitable Trust, the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, and The Duchossois Family Foundation.

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The Great Train Story @ the Museum of Science and Industry

Figure 29 Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: These are visitors looking at parts of The Great Train Story in the Transportation Gallery on Friday, June 4, 2010.

 

      Brick by Brick is a temporary exhibit of LEGO® models designed and built by LEGO® Certified Professional Adam Reed Tucker that opened on Thursday, March 10, 2016 that has been extended again through Sunday, April 1, 2018 (Easter Sunday).  Last year, Melissa Hack wrote in a Chicago Parent blog post, “If your child’s imaginary friends are fairies or they are obsessed with engines” one should take the family to the Museum of Science and Industry.

MSI is unabashedly my favorite museum. I could visit monthly. It helps it’s the only museum that all four of my children–boys, girls, young and old–can agree on and find something they want to do and enjoy. Your little fairy lovers need to see the newly restored Colleen Moore Fairy Castle. It’s a feast for the eyes and the ultimate game of I spy. If your children are into motors, whether that be cars, planes or boats, there is something here to inspire and entertain them and it’s all included in general admission!

Don’t miss: The Idea Factory, located on the lower level. It includes soft play for crawlers and water play and science fun for children 10 and under. It’s free with admission but capacity is limited so a wait time may be involved. *Pro-tip: If there is a wait list, leave one parent in line and go check out the circus exhibit that is right next to it. If you are willing to splurge, see Brick by Brick. There is lots to learn about architecture and tons of fun and hands-on activities for kids, plus Legos.

 

Brick By Brick Exhibit @ the Museum of Science and Industry Chicago
Brick By Brick Exhibit @ the Museum of Science and Industry Chicago

Figure 30 Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: It took LEGO® Certified Professional Adam Reed Tucker 145 hours to design and 230 hours to build this model of Cinderella’s Castle for Brick by Brick.

Brick By Brick Exhibit @ the Museum of Science and Industry Chicago
Brick By Brick Exhibit @ the Museum of Science and Industry Chicago

Figure 31 Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: Mr. Spector photographed this family looking at Cinderella’s Castle in Brick by Brick on August 23, 2016.

BrickByBrick_LegoMSI_wideFigure 32 Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: This is LEGO® Certified Professional Adam Reed Tucker’s model of the Palace of Fine Arts in the temporary exhibit Brick by Brick.  The Museum of Science and Industry is housed within the Palace of Fine Arts, which was built as a temporary art museum for the World’s Columbian Exposition (1893) and subsequently housed The Field Museum until it moved into its new home in Burnham Park.

26239595_10156418898367437_3154008151433629221_n

Figure 33 Credit: S.M. O’Connor Caption: If you like Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle at the Museum of Science and Industry, you will probably like the Thorne Rooms at The Art Institute of Chicago, and vice versa.  This is a copy of the exhibit catalog Miniature Rooms: The Thorne Rooms at The Art Institute of Chicago next to a copy of Within the Fairy Castle.

Located in the northeast corner of Jackson Park, the Museum of Science and Industry stands on 57th Street at the intersection with Lake Shore Drive in the Hyde Park Community Area.  During peak periods (including March 24-30, 2018 and April 2-8, 2018) it is open from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., but normally the M.S.I. is open from 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  The address is 5700 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60637.  The Website is https://wwwmsichicago.org/.  The phone number is (773) 684-1414.

Further, you may enjoy looking at the Thorne Miniature Rooms and The Deering Family Galleries of Medieval and Renaissance Art, Arms, Armor at The Art Institute of Chicago, which is located in Grant Park in downtown ChicagoThe Thorne Rooms were installed in The Art Institute of Chicago (A.I.C.) in the mid-1940s.[519]  In 1954, Narcissa Niblack Thorne, widow of Aaron Montgomery Ward’s nephew James Ward Thorne, donated the Thorne Rooms to the A.I.C. [520]  Mrs. Thorne was a friend of Mrs. Hargrave.[521]  She had the one-twelfth scale model miniature replicas of rooms from European palaces and famous American homes made, and showed them at A Century of Progress International Exposition (1933-34) and thirty of them had been exhibited in the American Art Today Building at the 1939 New York City World’s Fair. [522] The rooms, which covered the medieval period to the twentieth century, included a hall from the reign of King Louis XII, a Victorian parlor, an early American kitchen, and a Hepplewhite drawing room.  The Colonial bedroom was a copy of a chamber from an old house in Salem with replicas of antique furniture pieces from the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.[523]  Thirty of the American shadow boxes were made by Eugene J. Kupjack, who had taken art classes for a decade between ages eight and eighteen and attended Crane College. [524]   In 1937, he had read in the magazine Life about Mrs. Thorne making the European rooms using antiques and unsolicited sent her a miniature chair with a cane seat and plastic plate and goblet he had made, which prompted a phone-call from her. [525]   She inquired how he had known she was having difficulty finding canework and where he had purchased the glass plate and goblet.  His reply that they were made of Lucite plastic, not glass, by him, led to a job offer. [526]   A memorial service for Kupjack was held when he died in 1991, and before he attended it, Marshall Field V, then Chairman of the A.I.C.’s Board of Trustees, said the Thorne Rooms “remain of our most popular exhibits.” [527]

Meyric Reynold Rogers (1893-1972), Curator of Decorative Arts, wrote the first books on the Thorne Rooms, one of which was American Rooms in Miniature, which was first published in 1941.  This was an illustrated booklet with seventy-nine pages.  He used material from Mrs. Thorne.  The seventh edition was printed in 1974. His book Handbook to the European Rooms in Miniature had six editions between 1942 and 1948.  This was a booklet with illustrations that was sixty-three-pages-long in its 1943 edition and sixty-four-page-long in its 1948 edition.  Another book Rogers wrote, European Rooms in Miniature, Including a Chinese and Japanese Interior, was published in 1948. It had a copyright of 1962, and four editions published between 1976 and 1983.  This was a sixty-seven-page-long booklet with illustrations.  All three of these books were published under Mrs. James Ward Thorne’s name.

In 1983, Abbeville Press, Publishers, printed Miniature Rooms: The Thorne Rooms at The Art Institute of Chicago at the behest of the A.I.C.  For the new book, Bruce Hatton Boyer wrote an introduction about the history of miniatures and Mrs. Thorne’s effort to have the sixty-eight rooms built.  Mrs. Thorne’s son, Niblack Thorne, and his wife, provided information for the book. Fannia Weingartner wrote profiles of the sixty-eight rooms.  Lynn Springer Roberts, Curator of European Decorative Arts, reviewed these profiles.  Two outside experts helped her in that review processes.  These outside experts were Theodore Dell, who reviewed the profiles of the French rooms, and Anne F. Woodhouse, Curator of Decorative Arts at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, reviewed the profiles of the American rooms.  Fans had requested a book with full-color illustrations of the Thorne Rooms for years, and to this end Chicago-based photographers Kathleen Culbert-Aguilar and Michael Abramson provided two color photographs of each room for the book.  Taking the photographs was a laborious process.  The rooms have soft, indirect lighting.  To capture the effect, the photographers made exposures that took up to fifteen minutes.  Alice Pirie Hargrave (Colleen Moore’s ex-daughter-in-law), then-Technical Assistant for the Thorne Rooms, played a role in every stage in the composition of the book.  Susan F. Rossen, Editor and Coordinator of Publications, edited the book.  Cris Ligenza, Editorial secretary in the A.I.C.’s Publications Department, typed the manuscript.  Betty Seid, Publications Department Assistant, prepared the glossary.  Harvey Retzloff of Chicago designed the book.[528]

In February of 2010, Random House published first-time novelist Marianne Malone’s book for young readers The Sixty-Eight Rooms, which centers on the adventures of sixth-grade best friends Ruthie and Jack after they visit the Thorne Rooms.  Ruthie finds a magic key that allows her and Jack to shrink and enter the Thorne Rooms.  Each time the children enter a room they are transported to the time and place represented by that room.  Meanwhile, Jack’s mother is a struggling artist who fears eviction.  The book is a mixture of drama, fantasy, time travel, historical fiction, and mystery.

D49373_005Figure 34 Credit: Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago Caption: Mrs. James Ward Thorne. E-14: English Drawing Room of the Victorian Period, 1840–70 (detail), about 1937. The Art Institute of Chicago. Gift of Mrs. James Ward Thorne.

In 1982, with the assistance of the Illinois Attorney General, the trustees of the Harding Museum transferred the collection of arms and armor amassed by George F. Harding, Jr. (1868-1939) to The Art Institute of Chicago.[529]  [Harding was 2nd Ward Alderman, State Senator, and Chairman of the Cook County of the Republican Party back when Chicago was still a Republican stronghold.  He had housed his collection of arms, armor, musical instruments, walking sticks, propaganda posters from the First Great World War, a mummy in its sarcophagus, thirty-two Frederick Remington bronzes, and paintings by Old Masters in a castle-like building he erected next to his residence at 4853 Lake Park Avenue in Kenwood, which was demolished in 1965.[530]  The trustees purchased the old John Crerar Library building and three other buildings on Michigan Avenue, but sold them in 1981.[531]]  Frank W. Gunsaulus Hall at The Art Institute of Chicago opened with the Harding Collection on Thursday, March 24, 1983.[532]  A few years ago, The Art Institute of Chicago announced that the low ceilings did not allow for the display of banners and a knight’s suit of armor atop a horse’s armor, but that did become possible after fifty artifacts the curatorial staff considered to be highlights of the collection moved into Gallery 236 and Gallery 205.  If The Art Institute of Chicago could realize plans to open additional galleries, they could display more of the vast George F. Harding Collection.  Now, The Deering Family Galleries of Medieval and Renaissance Art, Arms, and Armor occupies Galleries 235 through 239.

In addition to the permanent exhibit, the exhibition The Medieval World at Our Fingertips: Manuscripts Illuminations from the Collection of Sandra Hindman is open in Gallery 204 at The Art Institute of Chicago through Monday, May 28, 2018.  There will be a related special event on Friday, April 27, 2018, when Christopher de Hamel will deliver the lecture Medieval Manuscripts with Christopher de Hamel at The Art Institute of Chicago’s Fullerton Hall from 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.  He recently retired as Librarian of Corpus Christi College at the University of Cambridge and is the author of Meeting with Remarkable Manuscripts.

The Art Institute of Chicago is on Michigan Avenue in Grant Park.  The address is 111 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60603.  It is open from 10:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily, except on Thursdays, when it is open until 8:00 p.m.  Illinois residents enjoy free admission on Thursday evenings from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.  The Website is www.artic.edu.

Lastly, if you like Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle, you will probably like Castle Lizzadro at The Lizzadro Museum of Lapidary Art.  [Lapidary is the art of cutting and polishing stone.]  William Tolliday of London, England, created Castle Lizzadro in 1984.  It is a memorial for James “Chris” Lizzadro, grandson of The Lizzadro Museum’s founder,  Joseph Lizzadro, Chairman of the Meade Electric Company.

Lizzadro Castle is representative of both lapidary art and gold-smithing. The eighteen-karat gold castle rises up from a Brazilian agate slab.  Faceted diamonds in the windows give the impression of light in the windows.  The castle is comprised of three separate castle keeps that stand atop hills that are really specimens of amethyst, malachite, azurite, and vanadium.  The castle keeps are attached to each other by bridges.  It may remind fans of Games of Thrones as a cross between a fantasy castle such as King Ludwig II of Bavaria’s Neuschwanstein Castle and the Disney castles it inspired and House Greyjoy’s Pyke castle in the Iron Islands.  Smaller gold buildings dot the landscape.  The phone number of The Lizzadro Museum is (630) 833-1616.  The address is 220 South Cottage Hill Avenue, Elmhurst, Illinois 60126.  Please note that The Lizzadro Museum of Lapidary Art is in Wilder Park in west suburban Elmhurst, Illinois but in 2019 will move to 1220 Kensington Road, Oak Brook, Illinois.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

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Braden, William. “Enthralled, Akihito Would Build Museum,” Chicago Sun-Times, 5 October, 1960, p. 18

Black, Cobey. “One Girl’s Folly,” The Honolulu Advertiser, 8 November, 1973, Section C, p. 25

“Brescia College Art Show Today,” Messenger-Inquirer (Owensboro, Kentucky), 12 December, 1965, p. 4A

Carson, Pirie, Scott & Company advertisement, Chicago Tribune, 17 October, 1956, p. 20

“Church Will Observe 75th Year,” Chicago Tribune, 10 November, 1963, Section 10 (Neighborhood News) South, p. 1

Clark, Patricia. “This Dollhouse Costs $8.5 Million.  Let’s Take a Tour,” Bloomberg, 20 August, 2015 (https://www.bloomberg.com/news/photo-essays/2015-11-11/astolat-dollhouse-castle-photos-worlds-most-expensive) Accessed 12/03/17

Coleman, Judy. Forward.  Silent Film Star: A Biography of the Silent Film Star. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. (2012), pages 1-2

Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World. Garden City, New York: Garden City Publishing Co., Inc., 1935.

Curie, William. “Lost Treasures,” Chicago Tribune, 6 June, 1993 (http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1993-06-06/features/9306070104_1_armor-collection-art-institute/3) Accessed 03/30/18

“Dollhouse Appraised at $8.5 Million Is to Tour,” The New York Times, 16 July, 2015 (https://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/17/arts/design/dollhouse-appraised-at-8-5-million-is-to-tour.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone&smid=nytcore-iphone-share&_r=0) Accessed 12/03/17

Eichberg, Robert. “When Stars Splurge,” Picture Play, Volume XLII, Number 4, June, 1935, p. 43

“Endre Levente Vitez,” Ukiah Daily Journal (Ukiah, California), 17 November, 2004, p. A2[533]

“Fairy Castle Given to Museum,” Progress, Vol. XXVIII, No. 1, January-February, 1977, p. 2

Fields, Mary Durland. “50 Years of Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle,” Chicago Tribune, 23 August, 1985 (http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1985-08-23/entertainment/8502250032_1_windsor-castle-dollhouse-science-and-industry) Accessed 04/07/18

Fowler, Glenn. “Colleen Moore, Star of ‘Flapper Films,” Dies at 85,” The New York Times, 26 January 1988, p. B6

“Inside the $7MILLION doll’s house built by silent movie star furnished with diamond chandeliers and paintings by Walt Disney,” Daily Mail, 31 July, 2013 (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2382313/Inside-7million-doll-house-built-silent-era-Hollywood-film-star-boasts-diamonds-chandeliers-tiny-artwork-painted-Walt-Disney.html) Accessed 03/20/18

Karcheski, Walter J. “George F. Harding and His ‘Castle,’” The Art Institute of Chicago, Arms & Armor: Highlights of the Permanent Collection (http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/exhibitions/Arms-and-Armor/resource/1246) Accessed 03/30/18

Kuhn, John. “The magic of miniatures: Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle makeover at the Museum of Science and Industry,” Chicago Parent, 11 December, 2013 (http://www.chicagoparent.com/magazines/web-only/2013-december/fairy-castle) Accessed 05/20/16

“London Concerts,” The Musical Times, 1 March, 1917, p. 130

Luce, Jim. “Dollhouse Castle Hosts Dancers Dec. 3, Orphans International Dec. 5,” The Stewardship Report: Connecting Goodness, 2 December, 2015 (http://www.stewardshipreport.com/st-judes-childrens-research-hospital/) Accessed 12/03/17

“Miniature Circus is Viewed by 256 Crippled Children,” The Cumberland News, 1 October, 1952, p. 5

“Miniature Circus is Viewed by 256 Crippled Children,” Cumberland Evening Times, 30 September, 1952, p. 15

“Mrs. James Thorne, Designer of Period Model Rooms, Dies,” The New York Times, 27 June, 1955, p. 35

Moore, Colleen.  The Enchanted Castle. Marie A. Lawson, illustrator.  Garden City, New York: Garden City Publishing Co., Inc., 1935.

Moore, Colleen. Colleen Moore’s Doll House.  Garden City, New York: Doubleday & Company, Inc., 1971, 1979.

Mount Merrion Historical Society, “Titania’s Palace Goes to Denmark” (http://www.mountmerrionhistorical.com/MM300/titania’s_palace.html) Accessed 01/18/18

Museum of Science and Industry, The Circus: An unforgettable exhibit presented by Sears, Roebuck and Co. at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry, 1973.

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry, 1949.

Museum of Science and Industry, Institutional Archives, Press Release, dated July 1, 1959, Press Releases 1958-1959, file “1959 April-August Press Releases”

“News of the World in Pictures,” The Salem News (Salem, Ohio), 3 June, 1964, p. 12

Obejas, Achy. “Expansion throws chink in Art Institute’s armor display,” Chicago Tribune, 15 May, 2001 (http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2001-05-15/features/0105140258_1_art-museum-art-institute-ian-wardropper/2) Accessed 01/11/18

“Science Museum Now Showing Circus Exhibit,” Wheeling Herald, 20 April, 1973, p. 43

“Shows How Wheels Make World Go Round,” Chicago Daily Tribune, 25 September, 1958, Part 5 (Neighborhood News), South, p. 1

Smith, Anne Day. “Elaine Diehl’s ‘Astolat’.” Treasures in Miniature. Edited by the Editors of Nutshell News. Waukesha, Wisconsin: Kalmbach Books, 1993. 24-39

Steinberg, Neil. “Famed Rooms House Stories,” Chicago Sun-Times, 7 January, 2011, p. 14

“Take a Bow, Private Clubs,” Chicago Tribune, 23 January, 1966, Section 5, p. 6

“Under the Marquee,” The Billboard, 9 April, 1949, p. 92

“Where to Go – What to See,” Chicago Tribune, 11 October, 1964, Section 5 (Chicago Visitor), p. 11

Wilkinson, Major Sir Neville. Titania’s Palace: An Illustrated Handbook, 1925.

Williams, Rob. “Inside the $7m fairy castle doll house built by 100 people for a Hollywood film star,” The Independent, 2 August, 2013 (https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/inside-the-7m-fairy-castle-dolls-house-built-by-100-people-for-a-hollywood-film-star-8743262.html) Accessed 03/20/18

Wolfe, Sheila. “Museum Dollhouse Undergoes Cleaning,” Chicago Tribune, 8 February, 1970, Section 1, p. 16

 

Secondary Sources

 

The Art Institute of Chicago, Miniature Rooms: The Thorne Rooms at The Art Institute of Chicago.  New York, London, Paris: Abbeville Press, Publishers, 1983.

Codori, Jeff. Colleen Moore: A Biography of the Silent Film Star. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. (2012)

Hastie, Amelie. Cupboards of Curiosity: Women, Recollection, and Film History. Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2007.

Kogan, Herman. A Continuing Marvel: The Story of the Museum of Science & Industry. Garden City, New York: Doubleday & Company, 1973.

Neff, Terry Ann R. Within the Fairy Castle: Colleen Moore’s Doll House at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry, 1997.

Pridmore, Jay. Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago. New York, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers in association with the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, 1997.

 

END NOTES

[1] Robert Eichberg, “When Stars Splurge,” Picture Play, Volume XLII, Number 4, June, 1935, p. 43

See also Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 3

Glenn Fowler, “Colleen Moore, Star of ‘Flapper Films,” Dies at 85,” The New York Times, 26 January 1988, p. B6

[2] Rob Williams, “Inside the $7m fairy castle doll house built by 100 people for a Hollywood film star,” The Independent, 2 August, 2013 (https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/inside-the-7m-fairy-castle-dolls-house-built-by-100-people-for-a-hollywood-film-star-8743262.html) Accessed 03/20/18

“Inside the $7MILLION doll’s house built by silent movie star furnished with diamond chandeliers and paintings by Walt Disney,” Daily Mail, 31 July, 2013 (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2382313/Inside-7million-doll-house-built-silent-era-Hollywood-film-star-boasts-diamonds-chandeliers-tiny-artwork-painted-Walt-Disney.html) Accessed 03/20/18

[3] Colleen Moore’s biographer Jeff Codori argued she may have been born on August 19, 1899 instead of August 19, 1902, but she may also have had an elder sister with the same name who died in infancy.  Jeff Codori, Colleen Moore: A Biography of the Silent Film Star. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. (2012), p. 9

[4] Jeff Codori, Colleen Moore: A Portrait of the Silent Film Star.  Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. Publishers (2012), pages 213 and 249

[5] Colleen Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House.  Garden City, New York: Doubleday & Company, Inc. (1971), p. 9

[6] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 9

[7] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 9

[8] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 9

[9] Cordoi, pages 244-246

[10] “The Silent Star Book Launch Party,” The Cincinnati Enquirer, 21 January, 1968, p. 83

[11] Eichberg, p. 43

See also Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 6

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 6

[12] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 11

[13] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 6

[14] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 12

[15] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 6

Terry Ann R. Neff, Within the Fairy Castle: Colleen Moore’s Doll House at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1997), p. 16

[16] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 6

Neff, p. 16

[17] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World. Garden City, New York: Garden City Publishing Co., Inc. (1935), p. 3

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 6

[18] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 6

Neff, p. 13

[19] Neff, p. 16

[20] Neff, p. 16

[21] Neff, p. 13

[22] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 3

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 6

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 6

Neff, pages 13 and 113

[23] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 6

[24] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle, pages 10 and 11

Neff, p. 16

[25] Codori, p. 213

[26] Born Lady Beatrix Louisa Lambton (1859-1944), she was the daughter of George Frederick D’Arcy Lambton, 2nd Earl of Durham (1828-1879) and his wife, Lady Beatrix Lambton (1835-1871).  She, in turn, was born Lady Beatrix Frances Hamilton (1835-1871), the daughter of James Hamilton (1811-1885), 1st Duke of Abercorn (1868-1885) and his wife Duchess Louisa (1812-1905).  Born Louisa Jane Russell, she was the daughter of John Russell (1766-1839), 6th Duke of Bedford, and his wife Duchess Georgina (died 1801).

[27] Major Sir Neville Wilkinson, Titania’s Palace: An Illustrated Handbook, (1925), pages 3 and 4

[28] Wilkinson, p. 3

[29] Wilkinson, p. 3

[30] Wilkinson, p. 4

[31] Mount Merrion Historical Society, “Titania’s Palace Goes to Denmark” (http://www.mountmerrionhistorical.com/MM300/titania’s_palace.html) Accessed 01/18/18

[32] Wilkinson, p. 4

[33] Wilkinson, p. 4

[34] Wilkinson, p. 4

[35] Wilkinson, p. 4

[36] Wilkinson, p. 4

[37] Wilkinson, p. 4

[38] Born in Kensington Palace in England, Princess Mary of Teck, was part of the princely House of Teck, a cadet branch of the royal House of Württemberg.  Her father was Count Francis von Hohenstein (1837-1900), known after 1863 as Francis, Duke of Teck.  He was a poor aristocrat, but he was closely related to the royal families of Württemberg, Great Britain, and Hannover, as well as the imperial family of Russia.  His antecedents were sufficient to wed, in 1866, Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge, a daughter of Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge, and, thus, a granddaughter of George III (1738-1820), King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1760-1820) and King of Hanover (1814-1820).

[39] Wilkinson, p. 4

[40] Mount Merrion Historical Society, “Titania’s Palace Goes to Denmark” (http://www.mountmerrionhistorical.com/MM300/titania’s_palace.html) Accessed 01/18/18

[41] Mount Merrion Historical Society, “Titania’s Palace Goes to Denmark” (http://www.mountmerrionhistorical.com/MM300/titania’s_palace.html) Accessed 01/18/18

[42] Mount Merrion Historical Society, “Titania’s Palace Goes to Denmark” (http://www.mountmerrionhistorical.com/MM300/titania’s_palace.html) Accessed 01/18/18

[43] Mount Merrion Historical Society, “Titania’s Palace Goes to Denmark” (http://www.mountmerrionhistorical.com/MM300/titania’s_palace.html) Accessed 01/18/18

[44] Mount Merrion Historical Society, “Titania’s Palace Goes to Denmark” (http://www.mountmerrionhistorical.com/MM300/titania’s_palace.html) Accessed 01/18/18

[45] Mount Merrion Historical Society, “Titania’s Palace Goes to Denmark” (http://www.mountmerrionhistorical.com/MM300/titania’s_palace.html) Accessed 01/18/18

[46] Mount Merrion Historical Society, “Titania’s Palace Goes to Denmark” (http://www.mountmerrionhistorical.com/MM300/titania’s_palace.html) Accessed 01/18/18

[47] Mount Merrion Historical Society, “Titania’s Palace Goes to Denmark” (http://www.mountmerrionhistorical.com/MM300/titania’s_palace.html) Accessed 01/18/18

[48] Mount Merrion Historical Society, “Titania’s Palace Goes to Denmark” (http://www.mountmerrionhistorical.com/MM300/titania’s_palace.html) Accessed 01/18/18

[49] Mount Merrion Historical Society, “Titania’s Palace Goes to Denmark” (http://www.mountmerrionhistorical.com/MM300/titania’s_palace.html) Accessed 01/18/18

[50] Mount Merrion Historical Society, “Titania’s Palace Goes to Denmark” (http://www.mountmerrionhistorical.com/MM300/titania’s_palace.html) Accessed 01/18/18

[51] Mount Merrion Historical Society, “Titania’s Palace Goes to Denmark” (http://www.mountmerrionhistorical.com/MM300/titania’s_palace.html) Accessed 01/18/18

[52] Lutyens designed many English country homes, war memorials after World War I, and public buildings.  He designed the enlargement and renovation of the Bois des Moutiers residence in Varengeville-sur-Mer, Normandy.   The English country homes he designed included Goddards in Abinger, Surrey; Deanery Garden in Sonning, Berkshire; Overstrand Hall in Overstrand, Norfolk; Tigbourne Court in Wormley, Surrey; Orchards in Bramley, Surrey; and the enlargement of Folly Farm in Sulhamstead, Berkshire.  For the Farrar brothers, he designed both a townhouse on St. James Square in Westminster and a country retreat in Sandwich, Kent, The Salutation. His structures in New Delhi include the All India War Memorial, which is now called the India Gate; the Viceroy’s House in New Delhi, which is now called the Rashtrapati Bhavan (Presidential Residence); and the Hyderabad House, which was the New Delhi palace of Mir Osman Ali Khan, the last Nizam of Hydrabad.

[53] The Palladian style of architecture is a neo-classical style of architecture developed by the Venetian architect Andrea Palladio (1508-1580).

[54] Wren was a successor to Jones (one step removed) in the office of Surveyor to the King.  Jones was the English-born Welsh architect who designed the Queen’s House at Greenwich, the Banqueting House at the Palace of White Hall, and the Queen’s Chapel at St. James’s Palace, amongst many other buildings. Wren was the English architect, scientist, and mathematician who designed St. Paul’s Cathedral in London, the Royal Naval College at Greenwich, the Royal Observatory at Greenwich, and the Wren Library at the University of Cambridge’s Trinity College.  He also oversaw the expansion of Kensington Palace and Hampton Court Palace.

[55] She had collaborated with Lutyens when it came to the design of the landscaping around several of the country homes Lutyens designed.

[56] Princess Marie-Louise was a daughter of Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg (1831-1917), and his wife, Princess Helena of the United Kingdom (1846-1923).  She had the misfortune of being the consort of Prince Aribert of Anhalt-Dessau (1866-1933) from 1891 to 1900, when his father annulled the childless marriage.  Through her mother, she was a granddaughter of Queen Victoria.

[57] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 18

Neff, p. 22

[58] Robert Eichberg, “When Stars Splurge,” Picture Play, Volume XLII, Number 4, June, 1935, p. 43

[59] Robert Eichberg, “When Stars Splurge,” Picture Play, Volume XLII, Number 4, June, 1935, p. 78

[60] Ibid

[61] Ibid

[62] Ibid

[63] Neff, p. 117

[64] Judy Coleman, “Forward.”  Silent Film Star: A Biography of the Silent Film Star. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. (2012), p. 2

[65] See also Jay Pridmore, Inventive Genius: The History of the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago (1996), pages 96 and 97

[66] Pridmore, p. 96

[67] Ibid

[68] Ibid

[69] Pridmore, p. 97

[70] Herman Kogan, A Continuing Marvel: The Story of the Museum of Science & Industry. Garden City, New York: Doubleday & Company (1973), p. 138

See also Pridmore, p. 97

[71] Kogan, p. 138 & 139

See also Within the Fairy Castle, p. 109

[72] Kogan, pages 142 &143

[73] Pridmore, p. 98

[74] Pridmore, pages 161 and 162

[75] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 29

[76] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 29

[77] Museum of Science and Industry, Press Release, dated August 9, 1958, p. 1

Museum of Science and Industry, Institutional Archives, Press Releases, 1958-1959, file “1958 June-August Press Releases”

[78] Ibid, pages 1 & 2

[79] Ibid, p. 2

[80] William Braden, “Enthralled, Akihito Would Build Museum,” Chicago Sun-Times, 5 October, 1960, p. 18

[81] Sheila Wolfe, “Museum Dollhouse Undergoes Cleaning,” Chicago Tribune, 8 February, 1970, Section 1, p. 16

[82] Ibid

[83] “Fairy Castle Given to Museum,” Progress, Vol. XXVIII, No. 1, January-February, 1977, p. 2

[84] Anne Day Smith, “Elaine Diehl’s ‘Astolat’.” Treasures in Miniature. Edited by the Editors of Nutshell News. Waukesha, Wisconsin: Kalmbach Books (1993), p. 31

[85] Smith, p. 31

[86] Smith, p. 31

[87] Smith, p. 25

[88] Patricia Clark, “This Dollhouse Costs $8.5 Million.  Let’s Take a Tour,” Bloomberg, 20 August, 2015 (https://www.bloomberg.com/news/photo-essays/2015-11-11/astolat-dollhouse-castle-photos-worlds-most-expensive) Accessed 12/03/17

[89] See also Patricia Clark, “This Dollhouse Costs $8.5 Million.  Let’s Take a Tour,” Bloomberg, 20 August, 2015

[90] “Dollhouse Appraised at $8.5 Million Is to Tour,” The New York Times, 16 July, 2015 (https://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/17/arts/design/dollhouse-appraised-at-8-5-million-is-to-tour.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone&smid=nytcore-iphone-share&_r=0) Accessed 12/03/17

[91] “Dollhouse Appraised at $8.5 Million Is to Tour,” The New York Times, 16 July, 2015

[92] Patricia Clark, “This Dollhouse Costs $8.5 Million.  Let’s Take a Tour,” Bloomberg, 20 August, 2015

[93] Patricia Clark, “This Dollhouse Costs $8.5 Million.  Let’s Take a Tour,” Bloomberg, 20 August, 2015

See also Jim Luce, “Dollhouse Castle Hosts Dancers Dec. 3, Orphans International Dec. 5,” The Stewardship Report: Connecting Goodness, 2 December, 2015 (http://www.stewardshipreport.com/st-judes-childrens-research-hospital/) Accessed 12/03/17

[94] Patricia Clark, “This Dollhouse Costs $8.5 Million.  Let’s Take a Tour,” Bloomberg, 20 August, 2015

See also “$8.5 Million Dollhouse to Go on Public Display for the First Time: Children’s Charities to Benefit,” PRN Newswire, 20 August, 2015 (https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/85-million-dollhouse-to-go-on-public-display-for-the-first-time-childrens-charities-to-benefit-300131420.html) Accessed 12/03/17

[95] “Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle” exhibit fact sheet, dated 11/99

[96] John Kuhn, “The magic of miniatures: Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle makeover at the Museum of Science and Industry,” Chicago Parent, 11 December, 2013 (http://www.chicagoparent.com/magazines/web-only/2013-december/fairy-castle) Accessed 05/20/16

[97] Ibid

[98] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 18

[99] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 18

Neff, p. 23

[100] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 20

Neff, p. 23

[101] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 18

[102] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 18 and 20

Neff, p. 23

[103] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 25

[104] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 25

[105] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 25

[106] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 87

Neff, p. 22

[107] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 87

Neff, p. 21

[108] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 25

[109] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 25

See also Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 8

[110] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 18 and 19

Neff, p. 22

[111] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 5

[112] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 70

[113] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 17

There is a close-up picture of the cradle on p. 19

Neff, p. 24

[114] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 17

[115] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 17

Neff, p. 21

[116] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 17 and 18

Neff, p. 21

[117] Neff, p. 19

[118] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 5

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 6

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 6

Neff, pages 13 and 113

[119] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle, p. 11

[120] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 5

[121] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 6 and 12

Neff, p. 13

[122] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 5

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 12

[123] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 12

[124] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 12

[125] Neff, p. 16

[126] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 5

[127] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 5

[128] Neff, p. 47

[129] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 8

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 69

Neff, p. 49

[130] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 69

Neff, p. 49

[131] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 69

[132] Pridmore, p. 97

See also Neff, p. 56

Pluto (“Giver of Wealth”) was an epithet of Hades, (Greek) God of the Underworld.  The Romans, who did not have a death god of their own, simply adopted Hades under the name Pluto.

[133] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 69

[134] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 9

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 69

Neff, p. 50

[135] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 9

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 70

Neff, p. 50

[136] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 70

[137] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 10

[138] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 70

Pridmore, p. 98

Neff, p. 50

[139] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 10

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 70

Pridmore, p. 98

Neff, p. 50

[140] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 8

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 74

[141] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 74

[142] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 74

[143] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 74

Neff, p. 53

[144] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 74

[145] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 74

[146] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 74 and 75

Neff, pages 53 and 55

[147] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 74 and 75

Neff, p. 53

[148] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 74 and 75

Neff, p. 53

[149] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 74

Neff, p. 53

[150] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 8

[151] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 8

[152] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 8

[153] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 5

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 72

Neff, p. 50

Amelie Hastie, Cupboards of Curiosity: Women, Recollection, and Film History. Durham and London: Duke University Press (2007), p. 55

[154] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 5

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 9

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 72

Neff, pages 50 and 55

[155] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 9

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 72

Pridmore, p. 97

Neff, pages 50 and 54

[156] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 72

Neff, p. 50

[157] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 5

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 8

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 72

Neff, p. 50

[158] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 72

[159] Hastie, p. 55

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 72 and 73

[160] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 10

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 72

[161] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 10

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 72

[162] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 72

See also Neff, p. 55

[163] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 11

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 72

Neff, pages 50 and 55

[164] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 11

[165] Neff, p. 55

[166] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 11

[167] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 11

[168] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 10

[169] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 10

[170] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 10

[171] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 27

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 10

[172] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 10

[173] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 27

[174] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 701 and 72

See also Neff, p. 55

[175] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 11

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 69

Neff, p. 49

[176] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 11

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 69

Neff, p. 49

[177] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 11

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 72

Neff, p. 55

[178] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 11

[179] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 11

[180] Neff, p. 50

[181] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 88

[182] Neff, p. 25

[183] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), pages 15 and 19

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 21

Neff, p. 27

[184] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 19

[185] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 19

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 21

[186] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 19

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 21

Neff, p. 32

[187] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 20

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 21

Neff, p. 32

[188] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 20

[189] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 20

[190] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 20

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 21

Neff, p. 32

[191] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 20

[192] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 22

Neff, p. 31

[193] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 22

[194] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 22

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 21

[195] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 22

[196] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), pages 15 and 20

[197] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 20

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 21

Neff, p. 27

[198] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 22

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 21

[199] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 21

Neff, p. 27

[200] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 22

[201] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 22

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 21 and 24

Neff, p. 32

[202] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 22

[203] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 22

[204] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 4, 5, and 32

[205] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 24

Neff, p. 27

[206] Ibid

[207] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 22

[208] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 17

Neff, p. 27

[209] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 17

[210] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 24

Neff, p. 27

[211] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 17

[212] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 24 and 25

Neff, p. 28

[213] Neff, p. 28

[214] Neff, p. 31

[215] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 25

Pridmore, p. 98

Neff, p. 28

[216] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 25

Neff, p. 28

[217] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 25

Pridmore, p. 98

Neff, p. 28

[218] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 25

[219] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 25

[220] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 25

Neff, pages 28 and 31

[221] Neff, p. 28

[222] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 25

Pridmore, p. 98

[223] Neff, p. 28

[224] Neff, p. 28

[225] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 27

Neff, p. 28

[226] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 27

Neff, p. 28

[227] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 27

Neff, p. 28

[228] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 27

Neff, p. 28

[229] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 27

Neff, p. 28

[230] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 27

Neff, p. 28

[231] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 27

Neff, p. 28

[232] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 27

Neff, pages 28 and 29

[233] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 28

Neff, p. 29

[234] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 27 and 28

Neff, p. 29

[235] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 28

[236] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 28

[237] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 28

Neff, p. 29

[238] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 28

Neff, p. 29

[239] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 28

Neff, p. 29

[240] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 28 and 29

[241] The Cross of Lorraine, which is a double-barred patriarchal cross, was adopted by de Gaulle as the symbol of the French Government-in-Exile.  It appears prominently as the symbol of the French Resistance in Casablanca (1942).

[242] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 29

[243] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 29

[244] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 29

[245] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 29

[246] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 30

[247] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 30

[248] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 30

[249] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 30

[250] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 30

[251] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 32

[252] Museum of Science and Industry, press release, dated July 1, 1959

Press Releases 1958-1959, file “1959 April-August Press Releases”

[253] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 32

[254] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 32

[255] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 16

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 22

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 33

[256] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 16

See also Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 22

[257] Neff, p. 37

[258] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doo House, p. 80

A Greek monk, Saint Giles founded the Saint-Gilles-du-Gard abbey in Septimania in what had been Gaul and is now France.

Neff, p. 40

[259] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, pages 5 and 23

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 11

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 80

Neff, p. 39

[260] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 23

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 80

Neff, p. 39

[261] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 23

[262] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, pages 5 and 23

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 80

Neff, p. 40

[263] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 23

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 11

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 80

[264] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 11

[265] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 23

[266] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 77

[267] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 77

Neff, p. 39

[268] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 77 and 80

[269] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 11

[270] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 23

[271] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 23

[272] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 11

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 85

Neff, p. 40

[273] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 85

Pridmore, p. 98

Neff, p. 40

[274] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 11

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 85

Neff, p. 40

[275] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 85

Neff, p. 40

[276] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 11

[277] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 84 and 85

Neff, p. 40

[278] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 16

[279] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 16

[280] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 82

Neff, p. 40

[281] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 82

[282] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 82

Bryce, p. 40

[283] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 16

According to the 1949 publication, it was over 500 years old.

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 85

Neff, pages 43 and 46

[284] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 16

[285] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 85

[286] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 85

Neff, p. 39

[287] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 85

Neff, p. 39

[288] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 16

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 82 and 83

Neff, p. 46

[289] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 82

[290] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 82

[291] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 80, 81, and 83

[292] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 86

Neff, pages 43 and 46

[293] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 86

Neff, p. 43

[294] Cobey Black, “One Girl’s Folly,” The Honolulu Advertiser, 8 November, 1973, Section C, p. 25

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 86

Neff, p. 43

[295] Cobey Black, “One Girl’s Folly,” The Honolulu Advertiser, 8 November, 1973, Section C, p. 25

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 86

[296] Cobey Black, “One Girl’s Folly,” The Honolulu Advertiser, 8 November, 1973, Section C, p. 25

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 86

Neff, p. 43

[297] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 16

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 83

[298] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 23

See also Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 16

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 80

Neff, p. 40

The 1935 and 1949 publications give the title of the painting as Holy Night.

[299] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 16

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 82 and 83

Neff, p. 43

[300] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 82 and 83

[301] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 82 and 83

Neff, p. 43

[302] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 16

[303] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 82

Neff, pages 40 and 46

[304] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 16

[305] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 16

Neff, p. 59

[306] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 16

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 12 and 35

Neff, p. 61

[307] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), pages 6, 10, and 16

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 12, 13, and 35

Neff, p. 61

[308] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 16

[309] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 5

See also Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), pages 6 and 16

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 35

[310] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 35

Neff, p. 61

[311] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 16

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 35

Neff, p. 61

[312] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 36

[313] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 17

[314] Neff, p. 66

[315] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 17

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 36

[316] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 36

[317] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 36

[318] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 17

[319] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 17

[320] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 17

[321] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 17

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 35

Neff, p. 61

[322] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 17

[323] See the picture on p. 36 of Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doo House

[324] Neff, p. 66

[325] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 17

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 35 and 36

[326] Neff, p. 63

[327] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 36

Neff, pages 61 and 63

[328] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 11

[329] Ibid

[330] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 17

Neff, p. 63

[331] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 65

Neff, p. 90

[332] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 17

Neff, p. 63

[333] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 17

[334] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 17

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 35

[335] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 17

The 1949 publication incorrectly states they were “a gift from the Dowager Empress of China.”

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 35

Neff, p. 61

[336] She was a Third-Grade Concubine of the Xianfeng Emperor (lived 1831-1861, reigned 1850-1861), as a Manchurian noblewoman who gave birth to his only son; mother of the Tongzhi Emperor, who came to the throne in 1861 at the age of five; and when he died, in 1875, she placed her nephew, Zaitian (1871-1908), on the throne as the Guangxu Emperor (1878-1908), but when he made the mistake of trying to have her killed, she had him held under house arrest in one palace or another from 1898 until his death on November 14, 1908; and she installed Puyi (1906-1967), the Xuantong Emperor (1908-1912, 1917), on the throne on November 14, 1908, before she died on November 15, 1908.  Effectively, she ruled the Manchurian-Chinese Empire from 1861 until her death in 1908, although for much of that time she shared the regency with Empress Dowager Ci’an (1837-1881), who had been the primary consort of the Xianfeng Emperor.

[337] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 19

[338] Neff, p. 69

[339] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 22

See also Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 19

Neff, p. 69

[340] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 22

See also Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 19

[341] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 22

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 42

[342] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 42

[343] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 38

Ms. Neff agreed with Mrs. Hargrave (Neff, p. 69).

[344] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 19

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 42

Neff, pages 70-72

[345] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 42

Neff, p. 71

[346] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 22

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 19

[347] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 19

[348] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 42 and 43

Neff, p. 71

[349] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 43

Neff, p. 71

[350] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 43

[351] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 43

[352] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 19

[353] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 43

Neff, p. 69

[354] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 19

[355] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 19

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 43

Neff, p. 69

[356] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 43

Neff, p. 69

[357] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 19

[358] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 43

Neff, p. 69

[359] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 38

Neff, p. 71

[360] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 38

Neff, p. 71

[361] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 38

[362] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 38

Neff, p. 71

[363] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 38

Neff, p. 71

[364] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 22

Neff, p. 73

[365] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 22

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 45

Neff, p. 75

[366] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 45 and 47

Neff, p. 75

[367] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 45

Neff, p. 75

[368] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 45

Neff, p. 75

[369] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 22

[370] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 22

[371] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 25

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 45

Neff, p. 75

[372] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 45

[373] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 25

Neff, p. 77

[374] Neff, p. 77

[375] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 25

Neff, p. 77

[376] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 45

Neff, p. 75

[377] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 44 and 45

Neff, p. 77

[378] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 45

Neff, p. 77

[379] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 45

[380] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 45

Neff, p. 77

[381] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 19

See also Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 25

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 51

[382] Neff, p. 79

[383] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 18

See also Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 25

[384] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 22

[385] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 22

[386] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 22

[387] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 51

Neff, p. 80

[388] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 23

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 27

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 52

Neff, p. 81

[389] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 52

Neff, p. 83

[390] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 52

Neff, p. 83

[391] “London Concerts,” The Musical Times, 1 March, 1917, p. 130

[392] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 27

[393] Neff, pages 82 and 83

[394] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 23

[395] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 24

[396] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 24

[397] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 24

[398] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 27

[399] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 52

Neff, p. 83

[400] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 52 and 53

Neff, p. 83

[401] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  53

Neff, p. 83

[402] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  53

[403] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 27

[404] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, pages 23 and 24

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 27

[405] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 24

[406] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 24

Neff, p. 83

[407] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 24

[408] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  53

Neff, p. 83

[409] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 27

[410] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  53

Neff, p. 84

[411] Neff, p. 84

[412] Neff, p. 86

[413] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 27

[414] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 5

[415] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 27

[416] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  53

Neff, p. 86

[417] Neff, p. 97

[418] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  57

[419] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  57

Neff, p. 99

[420] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 19

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 27

[421] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p ages 56 and  57

[422] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 21

[423] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 24

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 27

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  57

[424] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 25

[425] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 24

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 27

[426] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 27

[427] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 27

[428] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  57

[429] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  57

[430] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  57

[431] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  57

Neff, p. 99

[432] Neff, p. 87

[433] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  58

[434] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, pages 19 and 24

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 27

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages  58 and 59

[435] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  58

Neff, p. 89

[436] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  58

[437] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 24

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  58

Neff, p. 89

[438] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 24

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  58

Neff, p. 89

[439] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  59

Neff, p. 89

[440] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, pages 19 and 25

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 28

[441] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  59

Neff, p. 90

[442] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  59

[443] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 28

[444] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  62

Neff, p. 92

[445] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  62

Neff, p. 92

[446] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  62

Neff, pages 90 and 93

[447] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  62

Neff, p. 90

[448] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  62

Neff, pages 90 and 93

[449] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 25

[450] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 19

[451] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 24

[452] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 24

[453] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  58

Neff, p. 90

[454] For these details, see the picture of the bed on p. 88 of Within the Fairy Castle.

[455] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 24

[456] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 28

[457] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, pages 64 and 65

Neff, p. 90

[458] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 65

[459] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 24

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 28

[460] Neff, p. 93

[461] Neff, p. 93

[462] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 24

[463] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 24

[464] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 28

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 63

[465] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 63

Neff, p. 90

[466] “Colleen Moore ‘Doll House’ Showing Opens Saturday, Promises Marvels,” Albuquerque Journal, 13 June, 1946, p. 7

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 28

Cobey Black, “One Girl’s Folly,” The Honolulu Advertiser, 8 November, 1973, Section C, p. 25

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 63

Neff, p. 96

[467] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 63

[468] Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 28

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 64

Neff, p. 96

[469] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 63

[470] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 63

Neff, p. 96

[471] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 63

Neff, p. 96

[472] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 64

[473] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 64

[474] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 64

[475] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 65

Neff, p. 90

[476] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  58

[477] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p.  58

[478] Neff, p. 97

[479] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 25

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 28

Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 65

Neff, p. 99

[480] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 25

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 28

[481] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 65

[482] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 65

Neff, p. 99

[483] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 25

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 28

[484] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 25

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 28

[485] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 27

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 28

[486] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, pages 22 and 27

Museum of Science and Industry, The Doll House of Colleen Moore: A Fairyland Castle. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1949), p. 28

[487] See the pictures on pages 66 and 67 on Colleen Moore’s Doll House, and p. 98 of Within the Fairy Castle.

[488] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 27

[489] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 27

[490] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 27

[491] Colleen Moore’s Doll House: The Story of the Most Exquisite Toy in the World, p. 27

[492] Sheila Wolfe, “Museum Dollhouse Undergoes Cleaning,” Chicago Tribune, 8 February, 1970, Section 1, p. 16

See also Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 48

Neff, p. 104

Note, Mrs. Hargrave and Ms. Neff both referred to him as being the art director, but I have not found any newspaper articles that identified him by that title.

[493] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 48

[494] Moore, Colleen Moore’s Doll House, p. 48

Neff, p. 104

[495] Neff, p. 104

[496] “Brescia College Art Show Today,” Messenger-Inquirer (Owensboro, Kentucky), 12 December, 1965, p. 4A

“Endre Levente Vitez,” Ukiah Daily Journal (Ukiah, California), 17 November, 2004, p. A2

This was the obituary of his son.

[497] Carson, Pirie, Scott & Company advertisement, Chicago Tribune, 17 October, 1956, p. 20

[498] “Where to Go – What to See,” Chicago Tribune, 11 October, 1964, Section 5 (Chicago Visitor), p. 11

“Brescia College Art Show Today,” Messenger-Inquirer (Owensboro, Kentucky), 12 December, 1965, p. 4A

“Take a Bow, Private Clubs,” Chicago Tribune, 23 January, 1966, Section 5, p. 6

[499] “Church Will Observe 75th Year,” Chicago Tribune, 10 November, 1963, Section 10 (Neighborhood News) South, p. 1

[500] Sheila Wolfe, “Museum Dollhouse Undergoes Cleaning,” Chicago Tribune, 8 February, 1970, Section 1, p. 16

[501] “News of the World in Pictures,” The Salem News (Salem, Ohio), 3 June, 1964, p. 12

[502] “Shows How Wheels Make World Go Round,” Chicago Daily Tribune, 25 September, 1958, Part 5 (Neighborhood News), South, p. 1

[503]

See also Jay Pridmore, Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago. New York, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers in association with the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago (1997), pages 118 and 119

[504] Museum of Science and Industry, The Circus: An unforgettable exhibit presented by Sears, Roebuck and Co. at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago. Chicago: Museum of Science and Industry (1973), p. 1

See also “Miniature Circus is Viewed by 256 Crippled Children,” The Cumberland News, 1 October, 1952, p. 5

[505] M.S.I., The Circus, p. 1

[506] “Under the Marquee,” The Billboard, 9 April, 1949, p. 92

[507] “Miniature Circus is Viewed by 256 Crippled Children,” The Cumberland News, 1 October, 1952, p. 5

[508] “Miniature Circus is Viewed by 256 Crippled Children,” The Cumberland News, 1 October, 1952, p. 5

[509] “Miniature Circus is Viewed by 256 Crippled Children,” Cumberland Evening Times, 30 September, 1952, p. 15

[510] “Miniature Circus is Viewed by 256 Crippled Children,” Cumberland Evening Times, 30 September, 1952, p. 15

[511] “Science Museum Now Showing Circus Exhibit,” Wheeling Herald, 20 April, 1973, p. 43

[512] M.S.I., The Circus, p. 1

[513] M.S.I., The Circus, p. 1

[514] M.S.I., The Circus, p. 1

[515] M.S.I., The Circus, p. 49

[516] M.S.I., The Circus, p. 1

[517] M.S.I., The Circus, p. 49

See also “Science Museum Now Showing Circus Exhibit,” Wheeling Herald, 20 April, 1973, p. 43

[518] Memo dated March 14, 1989 from Terri Sinnott to Paul Huffer

[519] Neil Steinberg, “Famed Rooms House Stories,” Chicago Sun-Times, 7 January, 2011, p. 14

[520] “Mrs. James Thorne, Designer of Period Model Rooms, Dies,” The New York Times, 27 June, 1955, p. 35

[521] Mary Durland Fields, “50 Years of Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle,” Chicago Tribune, 23 August, 1985 (http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1985-08-23/entertainment/8502250032_1_windsor-castle-dollhouse-science-and-industry) Accessed 04/07/18

[522] “Mrs. James Thorne, Designer of Period Model Rooms, Dies,” The New York Times, 27 June, 1955, p. 35

[523] Ibid

[524] Rita Reif, “Eugene J. Kupjack, 79, Creator of Miniature Rooms for Museum,” The New York Times, 16 November, 1991

[525] Ibid

[526] Ibid

[527] Ibid

[528] The Art Institute of Chicago, Miniature Rooms: The Thorne Rooms at The Art Institute of Chicago.  New York, London, Paris: Abbeville Press, Publishers (1983), p. 7

[529] Walter J. Karcheski, “George F. Harding and His ‘Castle,’” The Art Institute of Chicago, Arms & Armor: Highlights of the Permanent Collection (http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/exhibitions/Arms-and-Armor/resource/1246) Accessed 03/30/18

[530] William Curie, “Lost Treasures,” Chicago Tribune, 6 June, 1993 (http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1993-06-06/features/9306070104_1_armor-collection-art-institute/3) Accessed 03/30/18

Achy Obejas, “Expansion throws chink in Art Institute’s armor display,” Chicago Tribune, 15 May, 2001 (http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2001-05-15/features/0105140258_1_art-museum-art-institute-ian-wardropper/2) Accessed 01/11/18

See also Karcheski

[531] Curie

See also Karcheski

[532] Karcheski

[533] This was the obituary of his son.

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